Demons, Beer, & Breastfeeding – The Top 14 Catholic Lists of 2014

Listers, thank you for another incredible year. The popular lists of 2014 are certainly diverse. Prayers for your workday, types of demonic activity, and sacred images of breastfeeding are all among this year’s finalists. The following is the third annual “top” list in the history of St. Peter’s List (“SPL”). To compare the popular trends of 2014 to past years, see Catholic Countdown: The Top 20 Lists of 2012 and Top 10 Most Popular Catholic Lists of 2013.

 

Father Amorth, exorcist for the Diocese of Rome via Trailer - Amorth L'esorcista, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rfGuu2S6DS4.
Father Amorth, exorcist for the Diocese of Rome via Trailer – Amorth L’esorcista, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rfGuu2S6DS4.

14. Fr. Amorth on the 4 Types of Curses

Father Gabriele Amorth claims to have performed over 70,000 exorcisms from 1986 to 2010. The good priest serves as an exorcist for the Diocese of Rome and is the founder and honorary president of the International Association of Exorcists. He has written two books: An Exorcist Tells His Story & An Exorcist: More Stories. And yes, his favorite movie is The Exorcist. In An Exorcist Tells His Story, the good father lays out the four types of curses:

1. Black Magic – Witchcraft – Satanic Rites
2. Curses, Simply
3. The Evil Eye
4. The Spell (aka Malefice or Hex)

The exorcist explains, “Curse is a generic word. It is commonly defined as ‘harming others through demonic intervention’… In my opinion, spells and witchcraft are two different types of curses. I do not claim to give a comprehensive explanation, and I rely solely on my own experience when I defend the following forms of curses.”

 

Ordinary Form, Ad Orientem. - Southern Orders, http://southernorderspage.blogspot.com.
Ordinary Form, Ad Orientem. – Southern Orders, http://southernorderspage.blogspot.com.

13. Facing God: 10 Advantages of Ad Orientem

SPL was delighted that a liturgical list made the top 14 lists of 2014, especially this one exploring the benefits of Ad Orientem. The list explains the basics of ad orientem, lists the benefits of the ancient practice as articulated by a wonderful priest, and gives several “bonus” ad orientem memes. The list explains, “Ad Orientem is Latin for to the east and refers to the direction the priest faces during the mass. Catholic churches are traditionally built facing the East, because, as Cardinal Ratzinger taught, this direction reflects the ‘cosmic sign of the rising sun which symbolizes the universality of God.’ The priest facing the altar is also referred to as Ad Deum, which is Latin for to God… While the ancient liturgies did speak of the priest turning and “facing the people” during certain parts of the mass, the concept of celebrating the entire mass versus populum is arguably an invention of the 1970’s, an invention that stands in direct contradistinction to the Church’s ancient traditions.”

 

Musical Notation Old Book

12. Glory of Rome: 5 Latin Hymns Every Catholic Should Know

Though published in August of 2012, this list of hymns in Latin gained immense popularity in 2014. In contrast, its counterpart article covering the five English hymns every Catholic should know – which was the nineteenth most popular list in 2012 and the ninth in 2013 – failed to make the 2014 list. Moreover, the third installment of SPL’s study of hymns, a collection covering Byzantine hymns, has yet to break into any annual top list. As with the ad orientem list, SPL is delighted to see lists with a liturgical focus rise in popularity, especially one revolving around the importance of Latin.

 

Our Lady of Mount Carmel, Chile.  Figura de la Virgen del Carmen de Chile, en el Templo Votivo de Maipú. La imagen fue donada por la Sra. Rosalía Mujíca de Gutiérrez el 16 de diciembre de 1956.
Our Lady of Mount Carmel, Chile. Figura de la Virgen del Carmen de Chile, en el Templo Votivo de Maipú. La imagen fue donada por la Sra. Rosalía Mujíca de Gutiérrez el 16 de diciembre de 1956.

11. The 6 Things You Should Know about the Brown Scapular of Our Lady of Mt. Carmel

“Modern heretics make a mockery of wearing the Scapular, they decry it as so much trifling nonsense,” says St. Alphonsus. Published during January of 2013, SPL’s list on the Brown Scapular explains the devotion, the marian history behind the practice, and the inseparable relationship between the Brown Scapular and the Holy Rosary. One of the more unique aspects of the Brown Scapular is the promise behind it. The list explains, “On July 16th 1251 the Blessed Mary made this promise to Saint Simon Stock: ‘Take this Scapular, it shall be a sign of salvation, a protection in danger and a pledge of peace. Whosoever dies wearing this Scapular shall not suffer eternal fire.’ She continues, ‘Wear the Scapular devoutly and perseveringly. It is my garment. To be clothed in it means you are continually thinking of me, and I in turn, am always thinking of you and helping you to secure eternal life.'” Though incredibly common among most Latin Mass communities, the devotion has plummeted after the Second Vatican Council and is almost non-existent among the Novus Ordo parishes. Since the list is written as a primer to the Brown Scapular, it makes an excellent way to introduce your fellow parishioners or your entire parish to this wonderful devotion.

 

Anónimo Inferno (ca. 1520)
Anónimo Inferno (ca. 1520)

10. The 6 Types of Extraordinary Demonic Activity

The wisdom of Father Amorth finds another place amongst the top lists of 2014. Published in 2011, the list categorizing different types of extraordinary demonic activity was among the first lists to be published on SPL. The good exorcist first distinguishes among ordinary and extraordinary demonic activity. The former is simply temptation, while the latter can fall into any of the six different categories listed below:

1. External Physical Pain Caused by Satan
2. Demonic Possession
3. Diabolical Oppression
4. Diabolic Obsession
5. Diabolic Infestation
6. Diabolical Subjugation, or Dependence

Fr. Amorth’s work strives to remind everyone – especially priests and bishops – that demonic activity is real, and those suffering under its effects should be able to find help within Holy Mother Church. He calls upon the Church to restore the Office of the Exorcist to every diocese, and he reminds the faithful that the best defense against the demonic is the sacramental life.

 

Mary bw banner

9. The 8 Prayers Every Catholic Should Know in Latin

Standing as the twelfth most popular list in 2012 and the seventh in 2013, the collection of fundamental Latin prayers remains a mainstay on SPL. The introduction of the list gives a brief insight into the importance of Latin in the Roman Catholic Church – In 1978 Pope St. John Paul II said, “We exhort you all to lift up high the torch of Latin which is even today a bond of unity among peoples of all nations.” Even Vatican II and Pope John XXIII lauded Latin and asked that it remain the universal language of the Church; however, today the Roman Church has turned its back on Latin and blamed it on the ever-shifting spectre or “spirit” of Vatican II. In support of Latin as the sacred language of the Latin rite, SPL collected 14 quotes on the importance of Latin in the Church, which includes many quotes from Vatican II documents and from post-Vatican II popes. Continuing in this proper understanding of Sacred Tradition, it is only fitting that the listers have a list to help them develop their use of Latin. The collected prayers are all the prayers one would need to pray the Holy Rosary in Latin.

 

Nichols Punch Meme 2

8. When Santa Punched a Heretic in the Face: 13 Memes on St. Nicholas

Published in 2013 and skyrocketing to the most popular list of that year, the SPL list on Santa Claus recounts the story of St. Nicholas slapping the heretic Arius at the Council of Nicea, AD 325. The universal draw of this story is evident in the fact this list is virtually only shared throughout Christmastime, but remains one of the most popular articles on SPL. Along with humorous memes, the list articulates the historic account of “Santa Claus.” According to the introduction, “St. Nicholas was born in AD 270 and became the Bishop of Myra in Lycia (modern day Turkey). He died on December 6, 343 leaving a legacy that would grow into a strong and multifaceted cult. He had a reputation for secret gift-giving, such as putting coins in the shoes of those who left them out for him, and thus became the model for Santa Claus, whose modern name comes from the Dutch Sinterklaas, itself from a series of elisions and corruptions of the transliteration of ‘Saint Nikolaos.’ Although he is usually referred to as Sinterklaas, he is also known as De Goedheiligman (The Good Holy Man), Sint Nicolaas (Saint Nicholas) or simply as De Sint (The Saint). His reputation evolved among the faithful, as was common for early Christian saints. The actual feast day of St. Nicholas is December 6th.” Though wrapped in a lighthearted package, the list helps educate the Faithful on the actual narrative of St. Nicholas in order to better participate in the full tradition of Christmastime.

 

St. Josemaria Escriva.
St. Josemaria Escriva.

7. St. Josemaria’s 17 Signs of a Lack of Humility

Published in early of 2013, this list focused on humility rose to the third most popular list of that year. As the introduction implies, the ascension of Pope Francis to the Throne of St. Peter was the main impetus for the article and for the interest surrounding the list. His Holiness Pope Francis has made the Church contemplate the virtue of humility and the qualities of true humility. St. Josemaria’s list is not an easy read. In fact, the list could operate as an examination of conscience in the area of pride. As the list states, humility is a virtue which we all ought to develop to bring ourselves in greater conformity with Christ as we seek “to temper and restrain the mind, lest it tend to high things immoderately.”

 

Credit: La Virgen de la Leche y Buen Parto, Facebook Group, edited.
Credit: La Virgen de la Leche y Buen Parto, Facebook Group, edited.

6. Our Lady of Milk: 20 Images of Mother Mary Nursing

Finishing as the second most popular list of 2013, the collection of images of Mother Mary nursing remains one of the most controversial lists on SPL. Despite the firestorm of opinions – whether over breastfeeding in general or nudity in Sacred Art – SPL’s original rationale for researching Our Lady of Milk remains strong – to support the beauty and importance of breastfeeding. As the 2013 introduction to the list explains: One factor was certainly the growing societal criticism of mothers who breastfed their children in public. The criticism of mothers breastfeeding had grown so loud within Western culture that even Pope Francis felt the need to publicly support mothers breastfeeding in public. The Holy Pontiff stated:

“There are so many children that cry because they are hungry. At the Wednesday General Audience the other day there was a young mother behind one of the barriers with a baby that was just a few months old. The child was crying its eyes out as I came past. The mother was caressing it. I said to her: “Madam, I think the child’s hungry.” “Yes, it’s probably time…,” she replied. “Please give it something to eat!” I said. She was shy and didn’t want to breastfeed in public, while the Pope was passing. I wish to say the same to humanity: give people something to eat! That woman had milk to give to her child; we have enough food in the world to feed everyone.”

Another factor is certainly North America’s Puritan culture being absolutely inexperienced with images of Mary’s breast. Though common in Latino/Hispanic cultures both in South America and in Europe, the images are quite foreign to many inside the United States.

 

Cardinal Burke visits the Sisters Adorers in Switzerland.
Cardinal Burke visits the Sisters Adorers in Switzerland.

5. Cardinal Burke: 15 Photos of this Wondrous Prince of the Church

As 2014 draws to a close, no other list has generated a more hate-filled, argumentative, and polarizing comment section than our simple photo gallery of His Eminence Cardinal Burke. Originally published in 2012, the list caught on fire toward the latter half of 2014 as rumors fueled expectations that Cardinal Burke would be demoted from Cardinal Prefect of the Supreme Tribunal of the Apostolic Signatura. In November of 2014, Pope Francis did in fact remove Cardinal Burke from his position and appoint him as the Cardinal Patronus of the Military Order of Malta. The traditionalist communities saw this move as nothing less than the most humiliating thing done to a Cardinal by a Pope in modern times, while the so-called progressive camps openly cheered the move as a clear papal rebuke of Cardinal Burke’s tone and style. As far as SPL goes, His Eminence Cardinal Burke is still held in utmost respect, and we agree with Pope Benedict XVI that good Cardinal is one of the best amongst the College. Hopefully, his new relationship with the Order of Malta will provide him with more time and resources to write and travel.

 

Angelus by Jean-François Millet.
Angelus by Jean-François Millet.

4. The 8 Prayers to Help You through the Workday

Another wonderful list of prayers makes it into the top lists of 2014. Published in 2012 and flying under the radar until 2014, the article submits practical prayers that could be said throughout the workday. SPL author Catherine explains, “Ora et Labora (“Pray and Work” to the layman), the motto of the Benedictine order shouldn’t just be used for those called to the consecrated life, but it needs to be ascribed for all Catholics in every walk of life, especially those in the workforce. I recently entered into the realm of the working mother, and I can honestly say that I have never been so busy in all my life. Being a working mother I have discovered that balancing the various duties I have between work and home can drive a woman to the point of screaming at the top of her lungs “SERENITY NOW!!!!” (If you are a Seinfeld fan you know what I am talking about).” Memorize these prayers or bookmark this list on your work computer, and may the peace of Christ be with you always and everywhere.

 

Father Amorth, exorcist for the Diocese of Rome via Trailer - Amorth L'esorcista, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rfGuu2S6DS4.
Father Amorth, exorcist for the Diocese of Rome via Trailer – Amorth L’esorcista, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rfGuu2S6DS4.

3. The 5 Prayers Recommended by an Exorcist to Combat Evil

Without question, 2014 was a good year for the wisdom of Father Amorth. The third and final list drawn from his experience is a list of prayers that can help a person defend themselves from evil. The prayers are as follows:

1. Prayer Against Malefice from the Greek Ritual
2. Anima Christi
3. Prayer Against Every Evil
4. Prayer for Inner Healing
5. Prayer for Deliverance

In his book An Exorcist Tells His Story, Fr. Amorth stresses that the number one protection from evil is the Sacrament of Confession and the Sacrament of the Holy Eucharist. Often times people want esoteric rituals to deliver them from evil, when in reality what they need is to become right with God. Along with regular Confession and reception of the Holy Eucharist, these prayers should be coupled with Our Lord’s Prayer and the Prayer to St. Michael the Archangel.

 

The Trappist Beers via Robin Vanspauwen/Bram Weyens
The Trappist Beers via Robin Vanspauwen/Bram Weyens

2. The 10 Authentic Trappist Ales

It is hard not to love beer made by monks. Originally posted in 2011 among the first wave of lists to hit SPL, the list climbed to the tenth most popular list of 2012. In 2013, the list included three new Trappist ales, and the expanded list landed at sixth in 2013. Continuing its growth in popularity, the list comes in as the second most popular list of 2014. The list explains what a Trappist ale is and the three conditions an ale must meet to be accepted into the official Trappist Association:

1. The beer must be brewed within the walls of a Trappist abbey, by or under control of Trappist monks.
2. The brewery, the choices of brewing, and the commercial orientations must obviously depend on the monastic community.
3. The economic purpose of the brewery must be directed toward assistance and not toward financial profit.

The list then goes on to summarize each individual brewery that has been accepted into the official association and makes Trappist ale.

 

A selection of the front of the St. Benedict's Medal.
A selection of the front of the St. Benedict’s Medal.

1. The 7 Things You Must Know about St. Benedict’s Medal

In 2012, the top list was a collection of original SPL graphics that were designed to fight against the HHS mandate and other government overreaches into the life of the Church. In 2013, the top list was the story of how St. Nicholas punched the heretic Arius right in the face. In 2014, the top list is a primer on the incredible history and power of the St. Benedict’s Medal. Published in 2012, the list started slow but has steadily risen as one of the primary online articles explaining the medal. In 2013, it was the fourth most popular list, and in 2014, it well outpaced the other contenders to become the most popular list on SPL in 2014.

Front
Front

It is difficult to grasp the significance of the medal until one has an understanding of all the lettering. Both the front and back of the medal are rich in symbolism. Regarding the front, the list explains: One side of the medal bears an image of St. Benedict, holding a cross in the right hand and the Holy Rule in the left. On the one side of the image is a cup, on the other a raven, and above the cup and the raven are inscribed the words: Crux Sancti Patris Benedicti (Cross of the Holy Father Benedict). Round the margin of the medal stands the legend Ejus in obitu nostro praesentia muniamus (May we at our death be fortified by his presence). The list further articulates the history of the medal, the entirety of its symbolism, and what evils the medal is used to ward against. St. Benedict, patron against poison and witchcraft, pray for us.

 

Thank you listers for an incredible year. God bless.

5 “Blessings of the Table” in Both Latin and English

The merciful and compassionate Lord has made a remembrance of his wondrous works. He has given food to those fearing him. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, for ever and ever. Amen.

Listers, “the Benedictiones Mensae are the sung Latin table prayers as used in the Roman and monastic usage.” SPL pulled the following collection from the EWTN collection of Latin prayers and the pictures and opening quote are taken from the New Liturgical Movement. The booklet featured in the photographs is from the Monastery of San Benedetto, Norcia – a monastery that in 2012 started making beer, Deo Gratias. For those interested in learning more about Latin and Latin prayers: SPL’s Collection of Lists on Latin.

 

The “Monks of Norcia” presenting the Holy Father with their newly crafted beer.

 

BENEDICTIONES MENSAE

“Blessings at the Table”
LATIN

1. Ante Prandium

“Before Lunch”

The Priest: Benedicite.
All: Benedicite.

The Priest: Oculi omnium
And all continue: in te sperant, Domine, et tu das illis escam in tempore opportuno. Aperis tu manum tuam, et imples omne animal in benedictione. Gloria Patri, et Filio, et Spiritui Sancto. Sicut erat in principio, et nunc, et semper, et in saecula saeulorum. Amen.

Kyrie eleison.
Christe eleison.
Kyrie eleison.

Pater noster… [continue in silence up to:]
V. Et ne nos inducas in tentationem.
R. Sed libera nos a malo.

The Priest then says: Benedic, Domine, nos et haec tua dona, quae de tua largitate sumus sumpturi. Per Christum Dominum nostrum.
R. Amen.

Then the Lector says: Iube, domne, benedicere.
The Priest: Mensae caelestis participes faciat nos Rex aeternae gloriae.
R. Amen.

 

2. Post Prandium

“After Lunch”

The Lector begins: Tu autem, Domine, miserere nobis.
R. Deo gratias.

All rise. The Priest: Confiteantur tibi, Domine, omnia opera tua.
R. Et sancti tui benedicant tibi. Gloria Patri, et Filio, et Spiritui Sancto. Sicut erat in principio, et nunc, et semper, et in saecula saeculorum. Amen.

The Priest continues: Agimus tibi gratias, omnipotens Deus, pro universis beneficiis tuis: Qui vivis et regnas in saecula saeculorum.
R. Amen.

The following psalm is then said by all: Laudate Dominum, omnes gentes, laudate eum, omnes populi. Quoniam confirmata est super nos misericordia eius et veritas Domini manet in aeternum. Gloria Patri, et Filio, et Spiritui Sancto. Sicut erat in principio, et nunc, et semper, et in saecula saeculorum. Amen.

Kyrie eleison.
Christe eleison.
Kyrie eleison.

Pater noster… [continue in silence up to:]
V. Et ne nos inducas in tentationem.
R. Sed libera nos a malo.
V. Dispersit, dedit pauperibus.
R. Iustitia eius manet in saeculum saeculi.
V. Benedicam Dominum in omni tempore.
R. Semper laus eius in ore meo.
V. In Domino laudabitur anima mea.
R. Audiant mansueti, et laetentur.
V. Magnificate Dominum mecum.
R. Et exaltemus nomen eius in idipsum.
V. Sit nomen Domini benedictum.
R. Ex hoc nunc et usque in saeculum.

The Priest: Retribuere, dignare, Domine, omnibus, nobis bona facientibus propter nomen tuum, vitam aeternam.
R. Amen.

V. Benedicamus Domino.
R. Deo gratias.
V. Fidelium animae per misericordiam Dei requiescant in pace.
R. Amen.

Pater noster… [all in silence]

V. Deus det nobis suam pacem.
R. Amen.

 

3. Ante Coenam

“Before Dinner”

The Priest: Benedicite.
All: Benedicite.

The Priest: Edent pauperes
And all continue: et saturabuntur, et laudabunt Dominum, qui requirunt eum: vivant corda eorum in saeculum saeculi. Gloria Patri, et Filio, et Spiritui Sancto. Sicut erat in principio, et nunc, et semper, et in saecula saeculorum. Amen.

Kyrie eleison.
Christe eleison.
Kyrie eleison.

Pater noster… [continue in silence up to:]
V. Et ne nos inducas in tentationem.
R. Sed libera nos a malo.

The Priest then says: Benedic, Domine, nos et haec tua dona, quae de tua largitate sumus sumpturi. Per Christum Dominum nostrum.
R. Amen.

Then the Lector says: Iube, domne, benedicere.
The Priest: Ad caenam vitae aeternae perducat nos Rex ternae gloriae.
R. Amen.

 

4. In Fine Coenae

“At the End of Dinner”

The Lector begins: Tu autem, Domine, miserere nobis.
R. Deo gratias.

All rise. The Priest: Memoriam fecit mirabilium suorum, misericors et miserator Dominus. Escam dedit timentibus se. Gloria Patri et Filio et Spiritui Sancto. Sicut erat in principio, et nunc et semper, et in saecula saeculorum. Amen.

The Priest continues: Benedictus Deus in donis suis, et sanctus in omnibus operibus suis, qui vivat et regnat in saecula saeculorum. R. Amen.

The following psalm is then said by all: Laudate Dominum, omnes gentes, laudate eum, omnes populi. Quoniam confirmata est super nos misericordia eius et veritas Domini manet in aeternum. Gloria Patri, et Filio, et Spiritui Sancto. Sicut erat in principio, et nunc, et semper, et in saecula saeculorum. Amen.

Kyrie eleison.
Christe eleison.
Kyrie eleison.

Pater noster… [continue in silence up to:]
V. Et ne nos inducas in tentationem.
R. Sed libera nos a malo.
V. Dispersit, dedit pauperibus.
R. Iustitia eius manet in saeculum saeculi.
V. Benedicam Dominum in omni tempore.
R. Semper laus eius in ore meo.
V. In Domino laudabitur anima mea.
R. Audiant mansueti, et laetentur.
V. Magnificate Dominum mecum.
R. Et exaltemus nomen eius in idipsum.
V. Sit nomen Domini benedictum.
R. Ex hoc nunc et useque in saeculum.

The Priest: Retribuere, dignare, Domine, omnibus, nobis bona facientibus propter nomen tuum, vitam aeternam.
R. Amen.

V. Benedicamus Domino.
R. Deo gratias.
V. Fidelium animae per misericordiam Dei requiescant in pace.
R. Amen.

Pater noster… [all in silence]

V. Deus det nobis suam pacem.
R. Amen.

And he adds: V. Tribuat Dominus benefactoribus nostris pro terrenis caelestia, pro temporalibus sempiterna.
R. Amen.

 

5. In Caena Serotina

“At collations: the small second meal allowed on fast days”

Lector: Benedicite.

The Priest gives the blessing, saying: Collationem servorum suorum benedicat Christus, Rex angelorum.
R. Amen.

 

Credit: the photograph is from New Liturgical Movement of the Monastery of San Benedetto’s booklet for the Benedictiones Mensae.

BENEDICTIONES MENSAE

“Blessings at the Table”
ENGLISH

1. Ante Prandium

“Before Lunch”

The Priest: May God bless you.
All: May God bless you.
The Priest: The eyes of all

And all continue: hope in You, Lord, and You give them food at a seasonable time. You open your hand, and you fill every living thing with blessing. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit, as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, for ever and ever. Amen.

Lord, have mercy.
Christ, have mercy.
Lord, have mercy.

Our Father… [continue in silence up to:]
V. And lead us not into temptation.
R. But deliver us from evil.

The Priest then says: Bless us, O Lord, and these Your gifts, which we are about to receive from Your bounty. Through Christ Our Lord.
R. Amen.

Then the Lector says: Bishop, we ask your blessing.
The Priest: May the King of eternal glory make us partakers in his heavenly meal.
R. Amen.

 

2. Post Prandium

“After Lunch”

The Lector begins: Do you, Lord, have mercy upon us.
R. Thanks be to God.

All rise. The Priest: May all your works confess You, Lord.
R. And may Your saints bless You. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, for ever and ever. Amen.

The Priest continues: We give You thanks, almighty God, for all Your benefices: Who live and reign for ever and ever.
R. Amen.

The following psalm is then said by all: Praise the Lord, all nations, Praise him, all peoples. For His mercy has been confirmed upon us, and the truth of the Lord remains forever. Glory be to the Father and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, for ever and ever. Amen.

Lord, have mercy.
Christ, have mercy.
Lord, have mercy.

Our Father… [continue in silence up to:]
V. And lead us not into temptation.
R. But deliver us from evil.
V. He distributed and gave to the poor.
R. His justice remains for ever and ever.
V. I shall bless the Lord at all times.
R. His praise will always be in my mouth.
V. In the Lord my soul will rejoice.
R. Let the meek hear, and let them rejoice.
V. Magnify the Lord with me.
R. And let us exalt His name together.
V. Let the name of the Lord be blessed.
R. From now and forevermore.

The Priest: Deign, Lord, to reward all of us doing good for Your name with eternal life. R. Amen.

V. Let us bless the Lord.
R. Thanks be to God.
V. May the souls of the faithful departed through the mercy of God rest in peace.
R. Amen.

Our Father… [all in silence]

V. May God grant us his peace.
R. Amen.

 

3. Ante Coenam

“Before Dinner”

The Priest: May God bless you.
All: May God bless you.
The Priest: The poor will eat

And all continue: and will be satisfied, and they will praise the Lord, who longs for them: let their hearts live for ever and ever. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, for ever and ever. Amen.

Lord, have mercy.
Christ, have mercy.
Lord, have mercy.

Our Father… [continue in silence up to:]
V. And lead us not into temptation.
R. But deliver us from evil.

The Priest then says: Bless us, O Lord, and these Your gifts, which we are about to receive from Your bounty. Through Christ Our Lord.
R. Amen.

Then the Lector says: Bishop, we ask your blessing.
The Priest: May the King of eternal glory make lead us to the meal of eternal life.
R. Amen.

 

4. In Fine Coenae

“At the End of Dinner”

The Lector begins: Do you, Lord, have mercy upon us.
R. Thanks be to God.

All rise. The Priest: The merciful and compassionate Lord has made a remembrance of his wondrous works. He has given food to those fearing him. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, for ever and ever. Amen.

The Priest continues: Blessed is God in His gifts, and holy in all His works, Who lives and reigns for ever and ever.
R. Amen.

The following psalm is then said by all: Praise the Lord, all nations, Praise him, all peoples. For His mercy has been confirmed upon us, and the truth of the Lord remains forever. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Lord, have mercy.
Christ, have mercy.
Lord, have mercy.

Our Father… [continue in silence up to:]
V. And lead us not into temptation.
R. But deliver us from evil.
V. He distributed and gave to the poor.
R. His justice remains for ever and ever.
V. I shall bless the Lord at all times.
R. His praise will always be in my mouth.
V. In the Lord my soul will rejoice.
R. Let the meek hear, and let them rejoice.
V. Magnify the Lord with me.
R. And let us exalt His name together.
V. Let the name of the Lord be blessed.
R. From now and forevermore.

The Priest: Deign, Lord, to reward all of us doing good for Your name with eternal life. R. Amen.

V. Let us bless the Lord.
R. Thanks be to God.
V. May the souls of the faithful departed through the mercy of God rest in peace. R. Amen.

Our Father… [all in silence]

V. May God grant us his peace.
R. Amen.

And he adds: V. May the Lord grant to us, who do good works, heavenly rewards instead of earthly reward, eternal rewards instead of temporal rewards.
R. Amen.

 

5. In Caena Serotina

“At collations: the small second meal allowed on fast days”

Lector: May God bless you.

The Priest gives the blessing, saying: May Christ, King of angels, bless this meal of His servants.
R. Amen.

The 8 Prayers Every Catholic Should Know in Latin

Domine Iesu, dimitte nobis debita nostra, salva nos ab igne inferiori, perduc in caelum omnes animas, praesertim eas, quae misericordiae tuae maxime indigent.

Listers in 1978 Bl. Pope John Paul II said, “We exhort you all to lift up high the torch of Latin which is even today a bond of unity among peoples of all nations.” Even Vatican II and Pope John XXIII lauded Latin and asked that it remain the universal language of the Church; however, today the Roman Church has turned its back on Latin and blamed it on the ever-shifting spectre or “spirit” of Vatican II. SPL collected 14 quotes on the importance of Latin in the Church and drew many from the actual Vatican II documents and from post-Vatican II popes. Continuing in this proper understanding of Sacred Tradition, it is only fitting that the listers have a list to help them develop their use of Latin. The following prayers are all the prayers one would need to pray the Holy Rosary in Latin. Enjoy.1

 

1. Sign of the Cross

In nomine Patris, et Filii, et Spiritus Sancti. Amen

 

2. Apostles’ Creed

Credo in Deum Patrem omnipotentem, Creatorem caeli et terrae. Et in Iesum Christum, Filium eius unicum, Dominum nostrum, qui conceptus est de Spiritu Sancto, natus ex Maria Virgine, passus sub Pontio Pilato, crucifixus, mortuus, et sepultus, descendit ad infernos, tertia die resurrexit a mortuis, ascendit ad caelos, sedet ad dexteram Dei Patris omnipotentis, inde venturus est iudicare vivos et mortuos. Credo in Spiritum Sanctum, sanctam Ecclesiam catholicam, sanctorum communionem, remissionem peccatorum, carnis resurrectionem, vitam aeternam. Amen.

 

3. The Lord’s Prayer

PATER NOSTER, qui es in caelis, sanctificetur nomen tuum. Adveniat regnum tuum. Fiat voluntas tua, sicut in caelo et in terra. Panem nostrum quotidianum da nobis hodie, et dimitte nobis debita nostra sicut et nos dimittimus debitoribus nostris. Et ne nos inducas in tentationem, sed libera nos a malo. Amen.

For a complete gallery of graphics click the image to visit our list: “I Stand With the Catholic Church.”

4. The Hail Mary

AVE MARIA, gratia plena, Dominus tecum. Benedicta tu in mulieribus, et benedictus fructus ventris tui, Iesus. Sancta Maria, Mater Dei, ora pro nobis peccatoribus, nunc, et in hora mortis nostrae. Amen.

 

5. Glory Be

GLORIA PATRI, et Filio, et Spiritui Sancto. Sicut erat in principio, et nunc, et semper, et in saecula saeculorum. Amen.

 

6. Oratio Fatimae (The Fatima Prayer)

Domine Iesu, dimitte nobis debita nostra, salva nos ab igne inferiori, perduc in caelum omnes animas, praesertim eas, quae misericordiae tuae maxime indigent.

 

7. Hail, Holy Queen

SALVE REGINA, Mater misericordiae. Vita, dulcedo, et spes nostra, salve. Ad te clamamus exsules filii Hevae. Ad te Suspiramus, gementes et flentes in hac lacrimarum valle. Eia ergo, Advocata nostra, illos tuos misericordes oculos ad nos converte. Et Iesum, benedictum fructum ventris tui, nobis post hoc exsilium ostende. O clemens, o pia, o dulcis Virgo Maria.

V. Ora pro nobis, Sancta Dei Genitrix.
R. Ut digni efficiamur promissionibus Christi.

 

[Update 11-3-12]

8. The Angelus

V. Angelus Domini nuntiavit Mariae.
R. Et concepit de Spiritu Sancto.

Ave Maria, gratia plena; Dominus tecum: benedicta tu in mulieribus, et benedictus fructus ventris tui Iesus. * Sancta Maria, Mater Dei ora pro nobis peccatoribus, nunc et in hora mortis nostrae. Amen.

V. Ecce ancilla Domini,
R. Fiat mihi secundum verbum tuum.

Ave Maria, gratia plena; Dominus tecum: benedicta tu in mulieribus, et benedictus fructus ventris tui Iesus. * Sancta Maria, Mater Dei ora pro nobis peccatoribus, nunc et in hora mortis nostrae. Amen.

V. Et Verbum caro factum est,
R. Et habitavit in nobis.

Ave Maria, gratia plena; Dominus tecum: benedicta tu in mulieribus, et benedictus fructus ventris tui Iesus.* Sancta Maria, Mater Dei ora pro nobis peccatoribus, nunc et in hora mortis nostrae. Amen.

V. Ora pro nobis, sancta Dei Genetrix,
R. Ut digni efficiamur promissionibus Christi.

Oremus. Gratiam tuam, quaesumus, Domine, mentibus nostris infunde; ut qui, Angelo nuntiante, Christi Filii tui incarnationem cognovimus, per passionem eius et crucem ad resurrectionis gloriam perducamur. Per eumdem Christum Dominum nostrum. R. Amen.

 

SPL has produced a few lists categorizing Latin themes. The most popular amongst them are 5 Latin Hymns Every Catholic Should Know and the aforementioned list 14 Quotes on the Importance of Latin.

  1. This list of Latin prayers is a selection from a more exhaustive list courtesy of EWTN’s database on Catholic prayers. []

14 Quotes in Support of Latin in the Roman Catholic Church

Listers, please take the time to review these quotes on the importance and immutability of Latin in the Roman Catholic Church. Note the sources: many of which can certainly not be labeled (and discarded) as “traditionalists.” Latin in the Church is not a liberal or conservative issue, but a Catholic one.1

It [the Traditional Latin Mass] is virtually unchanged since the third century.
John Henry Cardinal Newman, “Callistus”

 

For the Church, precisely because it embraces all nations and is destined to endure until the end of time … of its very nature requires a language that is universal, immutable, and non-vernacular.
Pope Pius XI, Officiorum Omnium, 1922

 

The day the Church abandons her universal tongue [Latin] is the day before she returns to the catacombs.
Pope Pius XII

 

The use of the Latin language prevailing in a great part of the Church affords at once an imposing sign of unity and an effective safeguard against the corruptions of true doctrine.
Pope Pius XII, Mediator Dei, 1947, Sec. 60

 

Latin is the immutable language of the Western Church.
Pope John XXIII

 

The Catholic Church has a dignity far surpassing that of every merely human society, for it was founded by Christ the Lord. It is altogether fitting, therefore, that the language it uses should be noble, majestic, and non-vernacular.
Pope John XXIII, Veterum Sapientia, February 22, 1962 (just eight months before the opening of Vatican II), chap. 13

 

We also, impelled by the weightiest of reasons … are fully determined to restore this language to its position of honor and to do all We can to promote its study and use. The employment of Latin has recently been contested in some quarters, and many are asking what the mind of the Apostolic See is in this matter. We have therefore decided to issue the timely directives contained in this document, so as to ensure that the ancient and uninterrupted use of Latin be maintained and, where necessary, restored.
Pope John XXIII, Veterum Sapientia,
February 22, 1962 (just eight months before the opening of Vatican II), chap. 13

 

The use of the Latin language … is to be preserved in the Latin rites.
Second Vatican Council, Sacrosanctum Concilium
(Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy), para. 36.1

 

In accordance with the age-old tradition of the Latin rite, the Latin language is to be retained by clerics in the Divine Office.
Second Vatican Council, Sacrosanctum Concilium
(Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy), para. 101.1

 

If the Church is to remain truly the Catholic Church, it is essential to keep a universal tongue.
Cardinal Heenan (1967)

 

The Latin language is assuredly worthy of being defended with great care instead of being scorned; for the Latin Church it is the most abundant source of Christian civilization and the richest treasury of piety…. We must not hold in low esteem these traditions of your fathers, which were your glory for centuries.
Pope Paul VI, Sacrificium Laudis, August 15, 1966, Epistle to Superiors General of Clerical Religious Institutes Bound to Choir, on the Celebration of the Divine Office in Latin

 

We cannot permit something that could be the cause of your own downfall, that could be the source of serious loss to you, and that surely would afflict the Church of God with sickness and sadness…. The same Church gives you the mandate to safeguard the traditional dignity, beauty, and gravity of the choral office in both its language [Latin] and its chant…. Obey the commands that a great love for your own ancient observances itself suggests….
Pope Paul VI, Sacrificium Laudis, August 15, 1966,
Epistle to Superiors General of Clerical Religious Institutes Bound to Choir, on the Celebration of the Divine Office in Latin

 

We address especially the young people: In an epoch when in some areas, as you know, the Latin language and the human values are less appreciated, you must joyfully accept the patrimony of the language which the Church holds in high esteem and must, with energy, make it fruitful. The well-known words of Cicero, “It is not so much excellent to know Latin, as it is a shame not to know it” [Non tam praeclarum est scire Latine, quam turpe nescire (Brutus, xxxvii.140)] in a certain sense are directed to you. We exhort you all to lift up high the torch of Latin which is even today a bond of unity among peoples of all nations.
Pope John Paul II, 1978

 

Nevertheless, there are also those people who, having been educated on the basis of the old liturgy in Latin, experience the lack of this “one language,” which in all the world was an expression of the unity of the Church and through its dignified character elicited a profound sense of the Eucharistic Mystery. It is therefore necessary to show not only understanding but also full respect towards these sentiments and desires. As far as possible these sentiments and desires are to be accommodated, as is moreover provided for in the new dispositions. The Roman Church has special obligations towards Latin, the splendid language of ancient Rome, and she must manifest them whenever the occasion presents itself.
Pope John Paul II, Dominicae Cenae,
February 24, 1980, sec. 10

  1. Thanks to John Henry for compiling the quotes []

Glory of Rome: 5 Latin Hymns Every Catholic Should Know

O salutaris Hostia, quae caeli pandis ostium!

Listers, our study of the best hymns within the treasury of the Church continues with a look at the Latin hymns all Catholics should know. A previous look at the best English hymns can be found at 5 English Hymns All Catholics Should Know.

1. O Sanctissima

Mater amata, intemerata: ora, ora pro nobis!

Believed to be a traditional Sicilian mariners folk song, O Sanctissima is most often heard today on Marian feasts. In Germany and Spain, this hymn has become closely associated with Christmastide.

2. Tantum Ergo Sacramentum

Salus, honor, virtus quoque: sit et benedictio!

Really the last two verses of the larger hymn Pange Lingua Gloriosi, this sublime piece was written by the revered St. Thomas Aquinas, a talented hymnologist as well as theologian. Historically, the complete Pange Lingua hymn is associated most closely with the rites of Maundy Thursday and Corpus Christi. In more modern times, the Tantum Ergo has become a staple of the Roman rite of Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament.

3. Salve Regina

O clemens, O pia, O dulcis Virgo Maria!

The “Hail, Holy Queen” in English — and one of the four principle Marian antiphons of the Roman Breviary — the Salve Regina dates at least to the 11th century. According to legend, St. Bernard of Clairvaux was moved by divine inspiration to add to the hymn the final three-fold petition to Our Lady. St. Alphonsus Liguori found this hymn so beautiful that he wrote an entire treatise on it in his book The Glories of Mary. Every Latin Catholic should strive to memorize this beautiful song of praise to our Mother.

4. O Salutaris Hostia

O salutaris Hostia, quae caeli pandis ostium!

Another hymn written by St. Thomas Aquinas, this piece is actually the last two verses of the Corpus Christi hymn Verbum Supernum Prodiens. Along with the Pange Lingua, this hymn was written at the request of Pope Urban IV, who instituted the Feast of Corpus Christi in AD 1264. Today, O Salutaris is most often heard in the ritual of Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament.

5. Ave Verum Corpus

O Iesu dulcis, O Iesu pie, O Iesu, fili Mariae.

A beautiful Eucharistic hymn dating from the 14th century, this has often been attributed to one of the mediaeval Popes Innocent, though historians are unsure of its actual origin. In the days of the pre-Tridentine liturgies, it was not uncommon for this hymn to be sung during the elevation of the Host at the Mass. Today, Ave Verum is most often associated with Christmastide and Eucharistic liturgies.

I STAND WITH THE CATHOLIC CHURCH: 10 Graphics In Defense of the Church

An unjust law is no law at all – we will not and cannot not comply.

Listers, the HHS mandate has jolted the soporific Catholic Church in America into action. We are at war. We are in a multi-front conflict that cannot be reduced to violations of religious liberty. The Church is calling the faithful to stand against the scourge of abortion, the unnatural and artificial recreation of marriage and family, and the inalienable right for Catholics to worship God in the mass and serve him in the poor according to the truth of the Gospels. As our world abandons God and natural law for the dictatorship of relativism, Holy Mother Church is calling us to defend the faith and to promote that which is natural and rational in man.

Spread the faith. Spread the truth. Let people know where you stand. Do not be afraid.

Permission and Use: Permission is given, indeed, it is encouraged that you use these images for any personal means especially on your blog, facebook or twitter. All we ask is that you kindly credit us with a link back to this page (when possible) and that you don’t modify the images. To download them, you can simply right-click on any image and choose your browsers “save as” or “download as” option. If you’re on an iOS device you can simply tap and hold on an image and a dialog will appear allowing you to save the image. Finally, if you’d like to you can download all 10 images in a .zip file.

The SPL Store is Open

 

1. I Stand with the Catholic Church

I Stand with the Catholic Church

2. Catholicam Sto cum Ecclesiam

Here is a Latin version of the same.

UPDATE 02/10/12: Mea culpa. Thanks to Josh McManaway in the comments and @JWY80 on Twitter for the reminder that “‘cum’ semper requirit casum ablativum.”

3. We Cannot – We Will Not – Comply

Echoing the words of our Bishops and the leaders of many Catholic institutions.

We Cannon - We Will Not - Comply

4. An Unjust Law is No Law

One of St. Augustine’s most famous quotes seems more applicable now than ever before in the history of the United States.

An Unjust Law is No Law

5. The Church Has Outlived Every Major Empire. Think Twice.

This isn’t the first time we have stood up and had to pay for it. We’re not going anywhere.

The Church has outlived every major Empire. Think Twice. HHS Mandate

6. The Gates of Hell Shall Not Prevail – Matthew 16:18

The Gates of Hell Shall Not Prevail - HHS logo

7. If “What Goes On” In The Bedroom Doesn’t Affect Me, Why Make Me Pay For It?

If what

8. Pregnancy Is Not A Disease

Pregnancy Is Not A Disease

9. “Give me an army praying the Rosary and I will conquer the world.” – Blessed Pope Pius IX

10. BONUS: Keep Calm and Catholic On

Keep Calm and Catholic On

Facebook Timeline Cover Images

Here are three images sized specifically for Facebook Timeline Cover Images. (You can thank Lister Tammy who made this suggestion in the comments.  Be sure to click the image and then save the full-sized version!

 

 

BONUS
7-21-12

Listers, we’ve recreated our popular Keep Calm and Catholic On graphic. The papal tiara is an original SPL design and red will be the new theme color.  We will soon begin production of this graphic on various SPL merchandise.

In the midst of all the troubles and anxieties we as Catholics now face in this modernist world, please remember to faithfully attend mass, pray the rosary and most of all – Keep Calm and Catholic On.

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The Domestic Church: 7 Steps to a Proper Catholic Home

The focal point of a Catholic home should be the family altar. This would be a place in which the family can gather to offer their prayers to God and ask the Saints to pray for them.

1. The King of the Catholic Home

It has been said that the Catholic home should be seen as “The Domestic Church”. With this being said, the Father is the head, the Mother is the beloved spouse, and the children are brought up learning to love and serve the Blessed Trinity. The true head of the Catholic home is Christ, just as the Head of the Church is the Supreme Pontiff, His Holiness. Christ should be known and recognized in each Catholic home as King; the family’s week should be centered around the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass and prayer is a must.

2. Proper Prayers

Parents should encourage their children to pray to the Lord Our God, The Blessed Virgin, and the Saints in their own words as well as the traditional prayers of the Church.

  • Prayers of the Rosary: Sign of the Cross, Apostles’ Creed, Our Father, Hail Mary, Glory Be, and Fatima Prayer
  • The Nicene Creed
  • Blessing before and after meals
  • Prayer to Guardian Angel
  • Act of Contrition
  • Act of Faith
  • Act of Hope
  • Act of Charity
  • Hail, Holy Queen
  • St. Michael prayer
  • The Eternal Rest Prayer

The parents are encouraged to also teach these prayers to their children in Latin as well.

“The day the Church abandons her universal tongue [Latin] is the day before she returns to the catacombs” — Pope Pius XII

3. Holy Water

Prayer can be encouraged through the most minor of things, such as placing Holy Water fonts in bedrooms and ones main door. All Catholics should know the use and purpose of Holy Water, St. Teresa of Avila says:

“…There is nothing like holy water to put devils to flight and prevent them from coming back again. They also flee from the cross, but return; so holy water must have great value.”

Parents too should bless their own children with Holy Water, by signing them on their foreheads. Lastly, each child should have a Blessed (by a priest) Crucifix in their bedrooms above their beds. The child should be taught to kneel when rising and going to bed and say their prayers with their parents.

4. The Focal Point of the Home

As soon as Catholics move into a new home, they should ask a priest to bless it. All families should consider with great deal consecrating their homes to the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus. Why? It is a simple way of letting Christ know that He is King.  The center of any home let alone a Catholic one should NEVER be a television! The focal point of a Catholic home should be the family altar. This would be a place in which the family can gather to offer their prayers to God and ask the Saints to pray for them. Family Rosaries, prayers for special graces, family novenas, and Lectio Divina should be said in front of the home altar.

5. Home Altar: Orientation & Necessary Items

Family altars, should ideally be placed on the Eastern wall, in the same orientation of church buildings; however, it is not necessary. The altar can be simple or elaborate, but beautiful nonetheless. Basic items that should be placed on the altar include:

  • Crucifix
  • Statue of Our Lady
  • Holy Water
  • icons (statues of Our Lord, Virgin, and/or Saints)
  • Blessed Salt
  • Rosaries
  • Charcoal incense burner
  • Blessed Candles, vigil candles, and Baptismal candles
  • 1962 Roman Missal

6. Home Altar: Recommended Literature

One should also consider: Breviary, the Douay Rheims Bible (only approved translation) Little Office of Our Lady, Holy Cards, flowers, the names/pictures of dead family members, palm branches, sacramental certificated (Baptism, 1st Holy Communion, Confirmation, Holy Matrimony). It would also be wise to keep a small library of books that will cultivate our Catholic faith: traditional Catechisms (Baltimore catechism, etc), “Lives of the Saints”, “Summa Theologica”, the writings of Sts Therese the Little Flower, St. John of the Cross,  St. Louis de Montfort, etc.

7. The Liturgical Season at Home

Families should change the home altar as the liturgical seasons change as well. During Passiontide (last two weeks of Lent), icons and statues should be covered with a purple cloth and there should be no flowers on the altar. In May, one might want to Crown Mary with Roses, keep a vigil candle going for as long as possibe, and bring Her various votive offerings, etc. Some families even clothe statues of the Virgin according to the liturgical season, for example, dressing Her in a white veil for the Feast of the Immaculate Conception, or black on Good Friday.

Parents should make the liturgical year come alive for their children. This will help them pay more attention to the Mass and sermons, etc. During family devotions, it would be wise to dim lights, burn incense, light candles, play sacred music. Catholic spirituality whether it is Eastern, or Latin is about engaging the senses.

Let us be inspired by the words of a great Doctor of the Church, St. Teresa of Avila:

“In all created things discern the providence and wisdom of God, and in all things give Him thanks.”

Queen of families, pray for us.

 

To obtain a free Enthronment to the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus kit, please write or email:

National Enthronement Center
P.O. Box 111
Fairhaven, MA 02719-0111
Tel. (508) 999-2680
Fax (508) 993-8233
Email: necenter@juno.com

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5 Quotes from Stephen Colbert on Protestantism

Protestants are “a single Pope away from reaching their full potential.”

Listers, many are aware that Stephen Colbert is an accomplished comedian and satirist, but he is also a practicing Catholic and a “Sunday School” teacher.1 Those who seek to run Colbert through a Catholic litmus test may be disappointed to know that many of his personal beliefs remain personal, but fortunately his religious quips and barbs are all public.

The following quotes are taken from Stephen Colbert’s excellent book: I Am America (And So Can You!). SPL highly recommends it for those seeking a light-hearted and intellectual laugh. For more on Colbert’s Catholicism, read The Washington Post article, Stephen Colbert May Play Religion for Laughs, but His Thoughtful Catholicism Still Shows Through.

Stephen Colbert’s Catholicism came into the spotlight when the comedian decided to testify before a House Committee concerning migrant workers. (Video)

Protestantism:

This is a variant form of Christianity, or “heresy.”

One Pope Away:

Protestants don’t make me angry as much as disappointed. Unlike the world’s crazy made-up religions, they’re so close to getting it right. They’re a single Pope away from reaching their full potential.

God’s Language:

Do you really think God prefers a mess of polyglot, disorganized prayers over the elegant hand-written Latin epistles from Benedict XVI?

Protestants Come Home:

Whenever you’re ready, the Church’s doors are always open. We’ll let you back into eternal salvation, and all you have to do is say a few Hail Marys, feel a little guilty, and deliver us your massive army of lockstep values voters.

Methodism:

What, the Church of England wasn’t heretical enough for you? – Don’t be a Meth-head.

  1. Catholic & Catechist: Multiple sources on Wiki. SOURCE []

2 Catholic Prayers for Blessing Beer

Bless, + O Lord, this creature beer!

Listers, in case you needed another reason to be Catholic, SPL presents a blessing for beer in both Latin and English.

Rituale Romanum – Blessing of the Beer

1. Blessing of the Beer in Latin

V. Adjutorium nostrum in nomine Domini.
R. Qui fecit caelum et terram.V. Dominus vobiscum.
R. Et cum spiritu tuo.

Oremus.

Benedic, Domine, creaturam istam cerevisiae, quam ex adipe frumenti producere dignatus es: ut sit remedium salutare humano generi, et praesta per invocationem nominis tui sancti; ut, quicumque ex ea biberint, sanitatem corpus et animae tutelam percipiant. Per Christum Dominum nostrum. Amen.

Cardinal Ratzinger enjoy a hefty mug of ale.

2. Blessing of the Beer in English

V. Our help is in the name of the Lord.
R. Who made heaven and earth.

V. The Lord be with you.
R. And with thy spirit.

Let us pray.

Bless, + O Lord, this creature beer, which thou hast deigned to produce from the fat of grain: that it may be a salutary remedy to the human race, and grant through the invocation of thy holy name; that, whoever shall drink it, may gain health in body and peace in soul. Through Christ our Lord.

R. Amen.

And it is sprinkled with holy water.

More on Beer: The 7 Authentic Trappist Ales