Worth Reading: 15 Works of Literature Under 200 Pages

Listers, there are few things as pleasurable as a good book. The following list is a collection of short classic literary works that generally fall under two hundred pages – sometimes depending on the publication.

Listers, there are few things as pleasurable as a good book. The following list is a collection of short classic literary works that generally fall under two hundred pages – sometimes depending on the publication. Each description is taken directly from the publisher’s online description.1

Literary Works on SPL

 

15 Short Literary Works Worth Reading

 

1. Lord of the Flies by William Golding

Lord of the Flies CoverLord of the Flies remains as provocative today as when it was first published in 1954, igniting passionate debate with its startling, brutal portrait of human nature. Though critically acclaimed, it was largely ignored upon its initial publication. Yet soon it became a cult favorite among both students and literary critics who compared it to J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye in its influence on modern thought and literature. William Golding’s compelling story about a group of very ordinary small boys marooned on a coral island has become a modern classic. At first it seems as though it is all going to be great fun; but the fun before long becomes furious and life on the island turns into a nightmare of panic and death. As ordinary standards of behaviour collapse, the whole world the boys know collapses with them—the world of cricket and homework and adventure stories—and another world is revealed beneath, primitive and terrible.Labeled a parable, an allegory, a myth, a morality tale, a parody, a political treatise, even a vision of the apocalypse, Lord of the Flies has established itself as a true classic.

 

2. Utopia by St. Thomas More

Utopia More CoverFirst published in Latin in 1516, Utopia was the work of Sir Thomas More (1477–1535), the brilliant humanist, scholar, and churchman executed by Henry VIII for his refusal to accept the king as the supreme head of the Church of England. In this work, which gave its name to the whole genre of books and movements hypothesizing an ideal society, More envisioned a patriarchal island kingdom that practiced religious tolerance, in which everybody worked, no one has more than his fellows, all goods were community-owned, and violence, bloodshed, and vice nonexistent. Based to some extent on the writings of Plato and other earlier authors, Utopia nevertheless contained much that was original with More. In the nearly 500 years since the book’s publication, there have been many attempts at establishing “Utopias” both in theory and in practice. All of them, however, seem to embody ideas already present in More’s classic treatise: optimistic faith in human nature, emphasis on the environment and proper education, nostalgia for a lost innocence, and other positive elements. In this new, inexpensive edition, readers can study for themselves the essentials of More’s utopian vision and how, although the ideal society he envisioned is still unrealized, at least some of his proposals have come to pass in today’s world.

 

3. Animal Farm by George Orwell

Animal Farm is the most famous by far of all twentieth-century political allegories. Its account of a group of barnyard animals who revolt against their vicious human master, only to submit to a tyranny erected by their own kind, can fairly be said to have become a universal drama. Orwell is one of the very few modern satirists comparable to Jonathan Swift in power, artistry, and moral authority; in animal farm his spare prose and the logic of his dark comedy brilliantly highlight his stark message. Taking as his starting point the betrayed promise of the Russian Revolution, Orwell lays out a vision that, in its bitter wisdom, gives us the clearest understanding we possess of the possible consequences of our social and political acts.

 

4. Of Mice & Men by John Steinbeck

They are an unlikely pair: George is “small and quick and dark of face”; Lennie, a man of tremendous size, has the mind of a young child. Yet they have formed a “family,” clinging together in the face of loneliness and alienation.Laborers in California’s dusty vegetable fields, they hustle work when they can, living a hand-to-mouth existence. For George and Lennie have a plan: to own an acre of land and a shack they can call their own. When they land jobs on a ranch in the Salinas Valley, the fulfillment of their dream seems to be within their grasp. But even George cannot guard Lennie from the provocations of a flirtatious woman, nor predict the consequences of Lennie’s unswerving obedience to the things George taught him.

 

5. Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hide by Robert Louis Stevenson

In September of 1884, Robert Louis Stevenson, then in his mid-thirties, moved with his family to Bournemouth, a resort on the southern coast of England, where in the brief span of 23 months he revised A Child’s Garden of Verses and wrote the novels Kidnapped and The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. An intriguing combination of fantasy thriller and moral allegory, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde depicts the gripping struggle of two opposing personalities — one essentially good, the other evil — for the soul of one man. Its tingling suspense and intelligent and sensitive portrayal of man’s dual nature reveals Stevenson as a writer of great skill and originality, whose power to terrify and move us remains, over a century later, undiminished.

 

6. Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad

Heart of Darkness CoverHeart of Darkness (1899) is a short novel by Polish novelist Joseph Conrad, written as a frame narrative, about Charles Marlow’s experience as an ivory transporter down the Congo River in Central Africa. The river is “a mighty big river, that you could see on the map, resembling an immense snake uncoiled, with its head in the sea, its body at rest curving afar over a vast country, and its tail lost in the depths of the land”. In the course of his travel in central Africa, Marlow becomes obsessed with Mr. Kurtz. The story is a complex exploration of the attitudes people hold on what constitutes a barbarian versus a civilized society and the attitudes on colonialism and racism that were part and parcel of European imperialism. Originally published as a three-part serial story, in Blackwood’s Magazine, the novella Heart of Darkness has been variously published and translated into many languages. In 1998, the Modern Library ranked Heart of Darkness as the sixty-seventh of the hundred best novels in English of the twentieth century.

 

7. Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

Fahrenheit 451 CoverRay Bradbury’s internationally acclaimed novel Fahrenheit 451 is a masterwork of twentieth-century literature set in a bleak, dystopian future. Guy Montag is a fireman. In his world, where television rules and literature is on the brink of extinction, firemen start fires rather than put them out. His job is to destroy the most illegal of commodities, the printed book, along with the houses in which they are hidden. Montag never questions the destruction and ruin his actions produce, returning each day to his bland life and wife, Mildred, who spends all day with her television “family.” But then he meets an eccentric young neighbor, Clarisse, who introduces him to a past where people didn’t live in fear and to a present where one sees the world through the ideas in books instead of the mindless chatter of television. When Mildred attempts suicide and Clarisse suddenly disappears, Montag begins to question everything he has ever known. He starts hiding books in his home, and when his pilfering is discovered, the fireman has to run for his life.

 

8. The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway

The Old Man and the Sea is one of Hemingway’s most enduring works. Told in language of great simplicity and power, it is the story of an old Cuban fisherman, down on his luck, and his supreme ordeal — a relentless, agonizing battle with a giant marlin far out in the Gulf Stream.

 

9. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s third book, stands as the supreme achievement of his career. This exemplary novel of the Jazz Age has been acclaimed by generations of readers. The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s third book, stands as the supreme achievement of his career. This exemplary novel of the Jazz Age has been acclaimed by generations of readers. The story of the fabulously wealthy Jay Gatsby and his love for the beautiful Daisy Buchanan, of lavish parties on Long Island at a time when The New York Times noted “gin was the national drink and sex the national obsession,” it is an exquisitely crafted tale of America in the 1920s. The Great Gatsby is one of the great classics of twentieth-century literature.

 

10. The Pearl by John Steinbeck

Like his father and grandfather before him, Kino is a poor diver, gathering pearls from the gulf beds that once brought great wealth to the Kings of Spain and now provide Kino, Juana, and their infant son with meager subsistence. Then, on a day like any other, Kino emerges from the sea with a pearl as large as a sea gull’s egg, as “perfect as the moon.” With the pearl comes hope, the promise of comfort and of security…. A story of classic simplicity, based on a Mexican folk tale, The Pearl explores the secrets of man’s nature, the darkest depths of evil, and the luminous possibilities of love.

 

11. The Stranger by Albert Camus

The Stranger CoverThe Stranger is not merely one of the most widely read novels of the 20th century, but one of the books likely to outlive it. Written in 1946, Camus’s compelling and troubling tale of a disaffected, apparently amoral young man has earned a durable popularity (and remains a staple of U.S. high school literature courses) in part because it reveals so vividly the anxieties of its time. Alienation, the fear of anonymity, spiritual doubt–all could have been given a purely modern inflection in the hands of a lesser talent than Camus, who won the Nobel Prize in 1957 and was noted for his existentialist aesthetic. The remarkable trick of The Stranger, however, is that it’s not mired in period philosophy. The plot is simple. A young Algerian, Meursault, afflicted with a sort of aimless inertia, becomes embroiled in the petty intrigues of a local pimp and, somewhat inexplicably, ends up killing a man. Once he’s imprisoned and eventually brought to trial, his crime, it becomes apparent, is not so much the arguably defensible murder he has committed as it is his deficient character. The trial’s proceedings are absurd, a parsing of incidental trivialities–that Meursault, for instance, seemed unmoved by his own mother’s death and then attended a comic movie the evening after her funeral are two ostensibly damning facts–so that the eventual sentence the jury issues is both ridiculous and inevitable. Meursault remains a cipher nearly to the story’s end–dispassionate, clinical, disengaged from his own emotions. “She wanted to know if I loved her,” he says of his girlfriend. “I answered the same way I had the last time, that it didn’t mean anything but that I probably didn’t.” There’s a latent ominousness in such observations, a sense that devotion is nothing more than self-delusion. It’s undoubtedly true that Meursault exhibits an extreme of resignation; however, his confrontation with “the gentle indifference of the world” remains as compelling as it was when Camus first recounted it.2

 

12. Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

Frankenstein CoverFew creatures of horror have seized readers’ imaginations and held them for so long as the anguished monster of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. The story of Victor Frankenstein’s terrible creation and the havoc it caused has enthralled generations of readers and inspired countless writers of horror and suspense. Considering the novel’s enduring success, it is remarkable that it began merely as a whim of Lord Byron’s. “We will each write a story,” Byron announced to his next-door neighbors, Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin and her lover Percy Bysshe Shelley. The friends were summering on the shores of Lake Geneva in Switzerland in 1816, Shelley still unknown as a poet and Byron writing the third canto of Childe Harold. When continued rains kept them confined indoors, all agreed to Byron’s proposal. The illustrious poets failed to complete their ghost stories, but Mary Shelley rose supremely to the challenge. With Frankenstein, she succeeded admirably in the task she set for herself: to create a story that, in her own words, “would speak to the mysterious fears of our nature and awaken thrilling horror — one to make the reader dread to look round, to curdle the blood, and quicken the beatings of the heart.”

 

13. The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka

“The Metamorphosis” (original German title: “Die Verwandlung”) is a short novel by Franz Kafka, first published in 1915. It is often cited as one of the seminal works of fiction of the 20th century and is widely studied in colleges and universities across the western world. The story begins with a traveling salesman, Gregor Samsa, waking to find himself transformed into an insect.

 

14. The Sorrows of Young Werther by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Celebrated as a leading figure of the German literary movement known as Sturm und Drang (“storm and stress”), Goethe made his reputation with this short novel, originally published in 1774. Its tale of a sensitive young man’s self-destructive passion for a lover who ultimately rejects him was based in part on the author’s own experiences, and the story’s tragic resolution inspired a wave of suicides among young romantics throughout Europe. Goethe’s portrayal of Zerrissenheit, “the state of being torn apart,” in which a character struggles to reconcile his artistic sensibilities with the demands of the objective world, proved tremendously influential to subsequent writers, and The Sorrows of Young Werther continues to speak to modern readers.

 

15. War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells

War of the Worlds CoverThe War of the Worlds is a science fiction novel by English author H. G. Wells. It first appeared in serialized form in 1897, published simultaneously in Pearson’s Magazine in the UK and Cosmopolitan magazine in the US. The first appearance in book form was published by William Heinemann of London in 1898. It is the first-person narrative of an unnamed protagonist in Surrey and that of his younger brother in London as Earth is invaded by Martians. Written between 1895 and 1897, it is one of the earliest stories that detail a conflict between mankind and an extraterrestrial race. The novel is one of the most commented-on works in the science fiction canon. The War of the Worlds has two parts, Book One: The Coming of the Martians and Book Two: The Earth under the Martians. The narrator, a philosophically inclined author, struggles to return to his wife while seeing the Martians lay waste to the southern country outside London. Book One also imparts the experience of his brother, also unnamed, who describes events as they deteriorate in the capital, forcing him to escape the Martian onslaught by boarding a paddle steamer near Tillingham, on the Essex coast.

  1. Descriptions taken from Amazon.com – please see title links to visit the page. []
  2. Ben Guterson. []

16 Practical Tips for Creating & Maintaining Your Daily Prayer Habit

Prayer is such a crucial part of the faithful practice of Catholicism but many of us struggle, at least at one time or another, to keep a regular prayer life. Maybe we’re busy in school, busy raising a family, busy at work, or even all of those at the same time, and find that somehow prayer seems too often to slip through the cracks. To help you keep prayer a regular part of your daily life we offer these practical tips which have helped us pray more regularly.

Listers, many of the most-read lists we’ve published are prayer focused: the best prayers to say before bed, really short prayers to say throughout the day, or even prayers recommended by an exorcist to fight evil, and of course the Latin prayers we should all know. We’ve also covered questions about prayer like why prayers aren’t always answered, and much, much more. This shouldn’t be surprising since prayer is such a crucial part of the faithful practice of Catholicism. However most of us also struggle, at least at one time or another, to keep a regular prayer life. Maybe you’re busy in school, busy raising a family, busy at work, or even all of those at the same time, and find that somehow prayer seems too often to slip through the cracks. To help you keep prayer a regular part of your daily life we offer these practical tips which have helped us pray more regularly. Of course, if you have tips to share please do so in the comments and we’ll highlight the best.


Use your iPhone to remind you of prayer

1. Use your Phone

Every smartphone has both built-in and third-party apps for reminders. Use the “repeat” function to set daily reminders to pray. If you are the kind of person who uses your calendar for planning out your tasks for the day, schedule time for prayer. Pictured above, the fantastic Due app for iOS is a great choice for iPhone users.

2. Be Specific

When you schedule prayer on your calendar, or add it to your to do list, don’t just say “Pray” but rather be specific and say something like “Pray the Rosary” or “Pray the Hail Holy Queen”. This removes what psychologists call decision avoidance, or what the rest of us call putting something off because it’s too hard to decide what to do. The whole point of a reminder is so that you don’t have to decide when to pray, add some specificity and you won’t have to decide what to pray in the moment either. Of course, once you’ve said your prayer you can add extemporaneous, or other prayers as you wish. This is just a way to help get things started.

 

Frame a prayer and place it somewhere visible

3. Place a framed prayer in plain sight

Often we just think about whatever is in front of us, so put some prayers in plain sight by writing them out, and framing them. Then you can hang them on the wall, or use the frames’ built-in stand to place them on a flat surface. Some good spots to consider might be near the sink in your kitchen, on your desk, on your nightstand, by the sink in your bathroom, on a bookcase you walk by frequently, or on a hall or entryway table.

 

Ave Maria written on bathroom mirror

EXPO Dry-Erase marker

4. No frame? Write a prayer on your bathroom mirror

As a convert there are many beautiful prayers from tradition which I do not know by heart and need to see over and over to remember, this simple tip is how I learned to pray the Memorare and made sure I saw it every day: Take a dry-erase marker and copy the prayer right onto the mirror in your bathroom. Now, every time you brush your teeth you can say a prayer. Bonus: Pick a long enough prayer and it’s a good way to make sure you’re brushing as much as you ought to.

 

Morning Prayer reminder on iPhone

5. Turn your morning alarm into a reminder to pray

If you use your phone to wake up in the morning, and it has the ability to edit the name of the alarm, change it to something like “Get up! Offer the day to God.” or “Good morning! Thank God for it!”

 

Modest Catholic home prayer shelf

6. Make a place for prayer

We’ve written about home altars before, and they’re a great option for making a dedicated space for prayer. Maybe your current situation does not allow for something very elaborate, that is ok. A simple cloth napkin with a small crucifix, perhaps some prayer cards and a tea light candle can be a dignified, if diminutive prayer corner. Having a dedicated space will be a reminder of, and an invitation to prayer whenever you see it.

 

Use Catholic Holy Cards as Bookmarks

7. Use prayers or holy cards as bookmarks

This is particularly useful for students: keep your place in books with prayers or holy cards and before you start reading pause to pray. Some Saints’ cards you might consider are St. Francis de Sales, St. Thomas Aquinas, especially when studying, St. Josemaria, and St. Joseph the Worker for your business reading.

8. Change your wallpaper

You know that giant background on your computer, iPad, or phone? You can change that. Consider finding an image that reminds you of prayer, or even using a free website or app to add a simple prayer to your favorite image. Some of these really short prayers might work well.

 

 

desktop-with-holy-cards-and-prayer-txt-file

9. Put an icon & prayer on your computer desktop

Another option is simply saving a holy image right to your computer’s desktop. Most computers can be set to show a preview of files, and you’ll have a small icon (in a couple senses) right on your desktop. You can also copy-and-paste prayers into simple text files or word documents and save right to your desktop.

10. Pray while exercising

My very favorite exercise is simply walking outdoors. I usually go on several walks every day, and nearly always pray the Rosary on my first walk. In my experience, being in the gym and lifting weights isn’t an environment well suited to lengthy prayer times – but if you’re a runner or enjoy walks like I do, try praying a rosary instead of cranking up the music or podcasts next time.

11. Turn your commute into adoration

No, you probably shouldn’t set up a mobile adoration chapel but if you live in a city where your commute is a nightmare, consider stopping by a church and praying for a few minutes rather than sitting at the office or in traffic. The traffic will be there, you may not be home until later anyway, so check for churches that may be along your commute and see if you might be able to spend some time in God’s presence.

 

12. Put a holy water font by your door

My father and mother-in-law recently gave my wife and me this beautiful little holy water font which belonged to my wife’s grandmother. I promptly installed it by our front door and more than being a family heirloom, it serves as a reminder to invoke the name of the Holy Trinity every time we are coming or going from our home. If your in-laws aren’t as great as mine, you can always find holy water fonts at local Catholic shops or even online.

 

Put holy cards on your desk to remind you of prayer

13. Place a holy card on your desk

Spend a lot of time at a desktop computer? Consider keeping a holy card taped to the computer monitor’s bezel, or propped up in the keyboard by the otherwise totally useless “function” keys. Or, simply place it on the desk but beware of it simply getting lost in the shuffle of regular papers.

 

Moleskine-like prayer journal

14. Keep a weekly prayer journal

What I say: “Oh my! I’ll pray for you.” What actually I do: forget. What I say: “Oh, that sounds like a great oppourtunity, I’ll say a prayer for you!” What I actually do: forget. What I say: “I’m so sorry to hear that, I’ll pray for you.” What I actually do: forget. I’m sure you can’t possibly relate to this, but here’s the weapon I’ve used to (mostly) overcome this terrible vice: A prayer journal. It is nothing fancy, just a simple black moleskine-styled notebook. We keep two lists in the notebook, one for things for which we want to give thanks, and another for prayer requests. Each Sunday, we turn the page, and update the lists for the week. Now, when I tell someone “I’ll pray for you” I either do it instantly, or add it to our prayer journal for the week.

15. Set your homepage to a prayer

Change your browser’s homepage to a favorite prayer. Perhaps one of our lists, Father Z’s Prayer Before Connecting to the Internet, or something from EWTN’s page of prayers. Then whenever you open up your browser, pause for a brief prayer.

 

girl praying

16. Pray with your family

Finally, the number one thing you can do develop a habit of prayer is to create a culture of prayer in your family. Make a point of praying together before and after meals, pray the Angelus as a family at noon if you’re together, pray the Rosary after dinner, pray compline at the end of the day, etc. Make it a regular practice, and hold each other accountable. For a fantastic introduction to creating a culture of prayer in your home, we highly recommend this book filled with practical advice and ageless principles: The Little Oratory: A Beginner’s Guide to Praying in the Home by David Clayton & Leila Marie Lawler.


Remember, these aren’t prescriptions which we think everyone must practice, just some ideas which have helped us keep prayer a regular part of our daily lives. If you have tips to share please do so in the comments below and we’ll highlight the best.

Night Holds No Terror: 7 of the Best Psalms to Pray Before Bed

Protect us, Lord, as we stay awake; watch over us as we sleep, that awake, we may keep watch with Christ, and asleep, rest in his peace.

Compline via anglicanbreviary.net
Compline via anglicanbreviary.net

Listers, the Liturgy of the Hours is a gift from Sacred Tradition that allows the Faithful to truly pray without ceasing. Though quite complex, this rich tradition is basically the Psalms adorned with hymns and other prayers. The Holy Mass and the Liturgy of the Hours are the only two public prayers of the Church. It is also interesting to note that under Canon Law, the Liturgy of the Hours is a requirement of all Roman Catholic priests and deacons. Though the Liturgy of the Hours has prayers for the entire day, the following list is a selection of Psalms from the prayers called Compline. Compline is “night prayer” and stems from the same Latin word as the word complete, because the prayers of Compline complete the day.

The following list highlights some of the more striking and thematic verses of the Compline psalms. Particularly after the Second Vatican Council, the psalms selected for compline thematically reflect the trust we have in God at the end of each day. We are going to sleep, and we pray that God may watch over us – even when we are surrounded by our enemies. The theme is perfectly captured by the antiphon: “Protect us, Lord, as we stay awake; watch over us as we sleep, that awake, we may keep watch with Christ, and asleep, rest in his peace.” May God grant all us of quiet night and a peaceful death.


 

 

Saturday Night (Sunday Vigil)

When I call, answer me, O God of Justice;
from anguish you released me;
have mercy and hear me!

O men, how long will your hearts be closed,
will you love what is futile and seek what is false?

[…]

“What can bring us happiness?” many say.
Let the light of your face shine on us, O Lord.

You have put into my heart a greater joy,
than they have from abundance of corn and new wine.1

 

Sunday Night

It is he who will free you from the snare
of the fowler who seeks to destroy you;
he will conceal you with his pinions
and under his wings you will find refuge.

You will not fear the terror of the night
nor the arrow that flies by day
nor the plague that prowls in the darkness
nor the scourge that lays waste at noon

A thousand may fall at your side,
ten thousand fall at your right,
you, it will never approach
his faithfulness is buckler and shield.2

 

Monday Night

In the day of distress I will call
and surely you will reply.
Among the gods there is none like you, O Lord;
nor work to compare with yours.

[…]

The proud have risen against me;
ruthless men seek my life:
to you they pay no heed.

But you, God of mercy and compassion,
slow to anger, O Lord,
abounding in love and truth,
turn and take pity me.3

 

Tuesday Night

The enemy pursues my soul;
he has crushed my life to the ground;
he has made me dwell in darkness
like the dead, long forgotten
Therefore my Spirit fails;
my heart in numb within me.

[…]

Lord, make haste and answer;
for my spirit fails within me.
Do not hide your face
lest I become like those in the grave.4

 

Wednesday Night

My soul is waiting for the Lord,
I count on his word.
My soul is longing for the Lord
more than watchman count on daybreak
Let the watchman count on daybreak
and Israel on the Lord.

Because with the Lord there is mercy
and fullness of redemption,
Israel indeed he will redeem
from all its iniquity.5

 

Thursday Night

He has put into my heart a marvelous love
for the faithful ones who dwell in his land.
Those who choose other gods increase their sorrows.
Never will I offer their offerings of blood.
Never will I take their name upon my lips.

O Lord, it you who are my portion and cup;
it is you yourself who are my prize.
The lot marked out for me is my delight:
welcome indeed the heritage that falls to me!6

 

Friday Night

For my soul is filled with evils;
my life is on the brink of the grave.
I am reckoned as one in the tomb:
I have reached the end of my strength,

like one alone among the dead;
like the slain lying in their graves;
like those you remember no more,
cut off, as they are, from your hand.

[…]

Wretched, close to death from my youth,
I have borne your trials; I am numb.
Your fury has swept down upon me;
your terrors have utterly destroyed me.

They surround me all the day like a flood,
they assail me all together.
Friend and neighbor you have taken away:
my one companion is darkness.

 

Concluding Prayers

Protect us, Lord, as we stay awake; watch over us as we sleep, that awake, we may keep watch with Christ, and asleep, rest in his peace.

Hail, holy Queen, Mother of mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope. To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve. To thee to we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this valley of tears. Turn, then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy toward us, and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus. O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary.

May almighty God grant us a quiet night and a peaceful death. Amen.

 

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Compline #prayer #catholic #catholicism #saints #jesus

A photo posted by St. Peter’s List (@stpeterslist) on

Night Prayer – #compline #prayer #catholic

A photo posted by St. Peter’s List (@stpeterslist) on

  1. Psalm 4; also read Psalm 134. []
  2. Psalm 91; the antiphon for this particular psalm is where this list draws its name: Night holds no terrors for me sleeping under God’s wings. []
  3. Psalm 86. []
  4. Psalms 143:1-11. []
  5. Psalm 130; read also Psalm 31:1-6. []
  6. Psalm 16. []

I Smell Heresy – 11 Cardinal Burke Memes

A few light-hearted memes regarding His Eminence Cardinal Burke.

Cardinal Burke Coat of Arms

 


 

Burke Meme 9

Burke Meme 8

Burke Meme

Burke Meme 5

Burke Meme 7

Burke Meme 1

Burke Meme 2

Burke Meme 3

Burke Meme 6

Burke Meme 4

Burke Meme 10

 


 

More on Cardinal Burke from SPL:

10 Really Short Prayers to Say During the Day

In his epistle to the Catholics in Thessalonica, St. Paul encouraged them to be in a constant state of prayer. He wrote, ‘Always rejoice. Pray without ceasing…’ Over the melliena since he wrote thats he Church has developed many short prayers that can be said throughout the day.

Listers, in his epistle to the Catholics in Thessalonica, St. Paul encouraged them to be in a constant state of prayer. He wrote, “Always rejoice. Pray without ceasing. In all things give thanks; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus concerning you all. Extinguish not the spirit.”1 In her attempt to follow this mandate, Holy Mother Church has over the centuries developed thousands of prayers and devotions for the Faithful to use. Along with the two public prayers of the Church – the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass & the Liturgy of the Hours – there are plenty of incredible short invocations that a Catholic can whisper under his or her breath throughout the day. Whether its right before you walk in to give a presentation and you whisper Come Holy Spirit, or right after that car narrowly misses you on the highway and with a sigh of relief you say Domine non sum dignus. The opportunity to pray throughout the day is ever-present, but often times we are not sure what to pray. The following list is a primer of the many short prayers Catholics can say throughout the day for a variety of occasions.2

 

1. Come Holy Spirit

0.63 seconds

Under the heading of Come Holy Spirit, the Catechism of the Catholic Church comments on this short invocation:

“No one can say ‘Jesus is Lord’ except by the Holy Spirit.” Every time we begin to pray to Jesus it is the Holy Spirit who draws us on the way of prayer by his prevenient grace. Since he teaches us to pray by recalling Christ, how could we not pray to the Spirit too? That is why the Church invites us to call upon the Holy Spirit every day, especially at the beginning and the end of every important action.

If the Spirit should not be worshiped, how can he divinize me through Baptism? If he should be worshiped, should he not be the object of adoration?

The traditional form of petition to the Holy Spirit is to invoke the Father through Christ our Lord to give us the Consoler Spirit.23 Jesus insists on this petition to be made in his name at the very moment when he promises the gift of the Spirit of Truth.24 But the simplest and most direct prayer is also traditional, “Come, Holy Spirit,” and every liturgical tradition has developed it in antiphons and hymns.

Come, Holy Spirit, fill the hearts of your faithful and enkindle in them the fire of your love.

Heavenly King, Consoler Spirit, Spirit of Truth, present everywhere and filling all things, treasure of all good and source of all life, come dwell in us, cleanse and save us, you who are All Good.

The Holy Spirit, whose anointing permeates our whole being, is the interior Master of Christian prayer. He is the artisan of the living tradition of prayer. To be sure, there are as many paths of prayer as there are persons who pray, but it is the same Spirit acting in all and with all. It is in the communion of the Holy Spirit that Christian prayer is prayer in the Church.

Though Come Holy Spirit is woven throughout many Catholic prayers, one of the more popular uses is in the following invocation:

Come, Holy Spirit, fill the hearts of Thy faithful and enkindle in them the fire of Thy love.

V. Send forth Thy Spirit and they shall be created.

R. And Thou shalt renew the face of the earth.

Let us pray. O God, Who didst instruct the hearts of the faithful by the light of the Holy Spirit, grant us in the same Spirit to be truly wise, and ever to rejoice in His consolation. Through Christ our Lord. Amen.3

 

2. Thy will be done.

0.76 seconds

The short prayer thy will be done invokes the prayer our Savior taught us – the Lord’s Prayer. Though saying the invocation softly under your breadth certainly calls to mind the entirely of the Lord’s Prayer, the specific line reads in full – thy will be done on earth, as it is in heaven.4

 

3. My God and my all.

1.03 seconds

Deus meus et omnia! The short invocation my God and my all has a long history in the Church and currently serves as a motto within the Franciscan Order. The origin of the phrase from a Franciscan perspective comes from a story about St. Francis staying up all night in prayer. The good saint, “lifting up his eyes and hands to heaven, and saying, with great devotion and fervor: ‘My God, my God’. And so saying and weeping continually, he abode even until morning, always repeating: ‘My God, my God,’ and nothing else.”5

 

4. Domine non sum dignus.

1.51 seconds

The Domine non sum dignus prayer – Lord, I am not worthy – is a longstanding acknowledgement of one’s unworthiness to receive the body, blood, soul, and divinity of Jesus Christ in the Eucharist. While that is certainly its most proper context, it can be used during the week as we ask for grace or experience some unexpected mercy.

 

5. O Heart of Jesus, all for Thee.

1.73 seconds

This short petition to the Heart of Jesus certainly shares similar characteristics to the prayers uttered in the Litany to the Sacred Heart of Jesus. While this specific line is not mentioned, any of the lines within the litany could also serve as short invocations. For example:

Heart of Jesus, burning furnace of charity, have mercy on us.
Heart of Jesus, abode of justice and love, have mercy on us.
Heart of Jesus, full of goodness and love, have mercy on us.
Heart of Jesus, abyss of all virtues, have mercy on us.
Heart of Jesus, most worthy of all praise, have mercy on us.
Heart of Jesus, king and center of all hearts, have mercy on us.

Many find the imagery surrounding the devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus to be stunning and certainly something on which it is worthy to mediate. These short invocations – though part of a larger devotion – can be an excellent way to incorporate the Sacred Heart into your day. Praying Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, have mercy on us is another excellent short invocation.

 

6. O God, have mercy on me, a sinner.

1.78 seconds

The short prayer is taken directly from the Holy Gospel according to St. Luke. The passage in pertinent part reads:

The Pharisee standing, prayed thus with himself: O God, I give thee thanks that I am not as the rest of men, extortioners, unjust, adulterers, as also is this publican. I fast twice in a week: I give tithes of all that I possess. And the publican, standing afar off, would not so much as lift up his eyes towards heaven; but struck his breast, saying: O God, be merciful to me a sinner.6

The phrase is also incorporated into the Jesus PrayerLord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, the sinner. While worthy of an entire independent conversation, the importance of the Jesus Prayer in Eastern Christianity is analogous to the prominence of the Hail Mary in the West. In Latin, this prayer reads – Domine Iesu Christe, Filius Dei, miserere me peccatorem.

 

7. Sit nomen Dómini benedíctum!

2.00 seconds

Blessed be the Name of the Lord! According to Fisheaters, “this prayer is a reparation for blasphemy. If one hears someone take the Name of the Lord in vain, it is good to say this prayer. The response to this prayer is “ex hoc nunc, et usque in sæculum!” (“from this time forth for evermore!”) or “per ómnia saecula saeculórum” (“unto ages of ages”).”7

 

8. All you holy men and women of God, pray for us.

2.18 seconds

Along with this invocation to all of the saints, any petition to any saint serves as an excellent short prayer. Which saint should you have pray for you? Each saint has a patronage over some area in life. St. Thomas Aquinas is the patron of academics and often prayed to by students and professors alike. St. Ambrose is a patron of students but also of bee keepers and domestic animals. St. Catherina of Siena is the patron against fire, miscarriages, and sexual temptation. Do not make the mistake the protestants do. Saints are not demigods over certain aspects of Creation. Imagine you struggle with alcoholism and you have a friend who did as well but has now been sober for over twenty years. Would you not go to him for prayer? His experience and virtue in this area seasons his prayers to God. He is intimately aware of the struggles you face. So too with the patronages of the saints. Their purview is predicated according to their experiences they had in life. A student does not pray to St. Thomas Aquinas, because the Angelic Doctor is the demigod of academics. He prays to him because his experience and virtue in academics lends him an excellent soul to join the student in prayer before God. Invoking the saints and particularly your personal patron saint throughout the day is an excellent practice.

 

9. In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, Amen.

2.80 seconds

Do not overlook this prayer. Like all commonly used prayers, it is in danger of becoming hackneyed. Invoking the Most Holy Trinity and making the sign of the cross is an excellent way to for a Catholic to bless themselves as they go about their day.

 

10. Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

3.61 seconds

A wonderful prayer from the Roman Rituale included in both litanies and in prayers used while saying the Holy Rosary.

 

***********

More on Prayer

  1. I Thess. 5:16-19, DR. []
  2. Timing of Prayers: The prayers are listed in order from shortest to longest, and the timing is certainly not scientific – unless you count sitting at a coffee shop with an iPhone timer scientific. []
  3. Latin: Veni, Sancte Spiritus, reple tuorum corda fidelium: et tui amoris in eis ignem accende. V. Emitte Spiritum tuum, et creabuntur. R. Et renovabis faciem terrae. Oremus. Deus, qui corda fidelium Sancti Spiritus illustratione docuisti: da nobis in eodem Spiritu recta sapere; et de eius semper consolatione gaudere. Per Christum Dominum nostrum. Amen. []
  4. Catechism of the Catholic Church (“CCC”) on the Lord’s Prayer. []
  5. Source: The Story of Deus meus et Omnia in the Franciscan Tradition. []
  6. Luke 18:11-13, DR. []
  7. Fisheaters – A handful of the prayers in this list were adopted from the longer list of short invocations listed on the traditional Catholic site Fisheaters. []

A Catholic Student’s 4 Ways to Evangelize a College Campus

Listers, college students are not only searching for jobs. Underneath all of the career recruitment and empty promises of radical individualism and liberation, there is a restlessness that resides in their hearts.

Listers, college students are not only searching for jobs. Underneath all of the career recruitment and empty promises of radical individualism and liberation, there is a restlessness that resides in their hearts. Speak to many who live and work on college campuses across the country, and they will tell you that there is an uneasy anxiety amidst the student population. Students are like sheep without a shepherd, searching for true meaning and authentic relationships in their lives. These young men and women are also searching for something much greater and they do not even know it. They are in search of Christ and His Church.

So how can we, as faithful Catholics, bring the love of Christ and the beauty of our faith to our peers? St. Peter’s List offers four ways of evangelizing on college campuses:

 

"On Quinquagesima Sunday, Archbishop Alexander Sample of Portland, Oregon celebrated a Pontifical Mass at the Throne in the Extraordinary Form." - New Liturgical Movement.
“On Quinquagesima Sunday, Archbishop Alexander Sample of Portland, Oregon celebrated a Pontifical Mass at the Throne in the Extraordinary Form.” – New Liturgical Movement.

1. Start with the Beautiful

Beauty is non-threatening. It breaks into our lives without our even noticing. It is captivating and awe-inspiring. Anyone can gaze upon the beauties of nature and be left speechless. Beauty has a way of transcending the human experience, moving our souls to recognize something beyond ourselves. Beauty is also able to galvanize the heart and mind in ways in which other forms of evangelization are incapable.

Thankfully, Holy Mother Church provides us with some of the greatest beauties the world has ever known. It is time that we unlock the treasures of our faith ranging from art, architecture, literature, and music. Throughout the past 2,000 years Catholicism has flooded the world with beauty, and we must show others this positive impact of our faith. Above all, the greatest contribution of beauty offered by the Church is the liturgy. The Mass is heaven on earth. Its beauty is indeed divine and we should not rob ourselves of dignified and beautiful worship. Unfortunately, our generation has matured in an age in which the liturgy has been abused, and many times these abuses have led to ugly liturgies. This has caused widespread disinterest in the liturgy and we must reclaim its beauty. Too often we are bombarded with things that are contrary to beauty and the Mass offers us a glimpse of our true home: heaven.

 

The Benedictine Monks of Norcia, Italy, sharing their beer with the community. - http://osbnorcia.org
The Benedictine Monks of Norcia, Italy, sharing their beer with the community. – http://osbnorcia.org

2. Witness Through Life & Community of Friends

“Preach the Gospel always, and when necessary use words” – so goes the famous saying of St. Francis of Assisi. The words of this great medieval saint still speak to us today. The joy that is shared amongst young men and women who are living their faith in a culture that is hostile to it is perhaps one of the greatest and most powerful witnesses to the Gospel. As another famous Francis, His Holiness Pope Francis, stated, “Christians are ready to proclaim the Gospel because they can’t hide the joy that comes from knowing Christ.”1 This joy of our faith must radiate to all of our friendships and activities on college campuses.

College is a time when friendships are built. We are all in search of friends that truly care for the good of the other. We must build a culture and community of friendship on campus that is deeply rooted in our Catholic faith. This does not mean that we become enslaved by our faith or live a form of lay-clericalism; rather, friendships rooted in Christ free us to care for one another truly and enjoy the ‘”unseriousness” of our lives. Belloc said it best: “Wherever the Catholic sun doth shine, there is always laughter and good red wine.” Let us celebrate our faith and enjoy the victory of Christ on the Cross. Create events, parties, and activities around the liturgical calendar. Have celebrations on the feast of great saints, invite friends to Mass, host a barbecue. Whatever it may be, if you build up a Catholic community based on authentic friendships and joy, people will flock to it. Tap into groups such as the Knights of Columbus or Catholic Daughters of America to host events.

 

The excellent Fr. James V. Schall, S.J. via iwp.edu
The excellent Fr. James V. Schall, S.J. via iwp.edu

3. Articulate Catholic Teaching

In this world of false idols and pseudo-truths, young men and women hunger for truth in their lives. Christ is the truth that will set them free. He is the One they are searching for and His truth is held by Holy Mother Church and her teachings. Let us then “always be prepared to give an answer to everyone who asks you to give the reason for the hope that you have. But do this with gentleness and respect” (1 Pet 3:15). We must bring our views to the classroom, invite speakers to give lectures, and start reading groups. Build your own community of learning. Catholicism contains an intellectual history that surpasses every other entity in the history of the world. We must unlock this beautiful tradition for those who are searching for the Truth.

Finally, do not hesitate to defend the Church against a group of peers or professors in the classroom. Many times people haven’t even heard of a true defense of the Church or the answers to the many issues that she is attacked for holding. More often than not, people will respect and even be surprised by the Church’s answers to these questions.

 

Cardina Bergoglio reportedly kissing the foot of an aids patient.
Cardina Bergoglio reportedly kissing the foot of an aids patient.

4. Charity

Mother Theresa, Saint Dominic, Pope Francis… why do these holy men and women capture the hearts and attention of the world? No matter what time period or culture, people are drawn to works of charity and mercy. We must practice what we preach. Inviting friends to participate in works of mercy and charity will turn even the hardest of hearts into living flesh. Serving food to the homeless, volunteering at a crisis pregnancy center, or building a place of shelter for those in need are all practical examples of Christian charity.

However, we must never lose sight of those on the “existential” peripheries. Those who do not know Christ are truly the poorest among us. It is also a work of charity to bring Christ into their lives. We have a duty to help those who are confused about the Church and reject her teachings. Clarifying what the Church stands for — and why — is also an act of charity for those who are outside of Her life-renewing sacraments.

 

Conclusion
The restlessness experienced during these college years often leads students to search for something deeper in their lives. As the great Fr. James V. Schall, S.J. said, “College exists so that we are freed by knowing the relation between “Veritas” and “Logos,” between “Cosmos” and our minds, between the what is and the “I am.”2 Catholicism is all-encompassing. It permeates our whole life, not in a way that binds us, but in a way that frees us toward the good our community, and our friends. Let us share this great gift with those around us.

St. Thomas Aquinas, patron of students, pray for us!


Louis Cona Profile

Louis Cona is an undergraduate at Georgetown University studying Government and Philosophy. He serves and coordinates the Traditional Latin Mass on campus and is an active member of the Georgetown Knights of Columbus. He is also the author of the SPL list 4 Ways to Save your Soul on a College Campus.

 

 

 

 

  1. Source []
  2. Source []

The Real Presence: 13 Memes on the Holy Eucharist

Then Jesus said to them: Amen, amen I say unto you: Except you eat the flesh of the Son of man, and drink his blood, you shall not have life in you. He that eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, hath everlasting life: and I will raise him up in the last day.

Listers, the Holy Eucharist is the body, blood, soul, and divinity of Our Lord Jesus Christ. Many of the following memes focus on the sixth chapter of St. John’s Gospel, which is often referred to as the “Eucharistic Discourse.”1 It is the cornerstone passage on understanding how the faithful participate in Christ’s eternal sacrifice. Take time to read the passage and note how Christ continually pushes back against the crowd. When He claims to be the bread of life, the crowd murmurs against him. Christ responds with an even more bold statement and receives even more criticism. Finally, Christ claims:

Amen, amen I say unto you: Except you eat the flesh of the Son of man, and drink his blood, you shall not have life in you. He that eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, hath everlasting life: and I will raise him up in the last day.

For my flesh is meat indeed: and my blood is drink indeed. He that eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, abideth in me, and I in him.

After Christ commands his disciples must eat his flesh and drink his blood, a unique situation arises. Scripture notes, “After this many of his disciples went back; and walked no more with him.” Christ makes no attempt to pull these sheep back into the fold by clarifying to them that his statements were metaphorical; rather, he lets the literal interpretation – which would be scandalizing for any Jew of that time – stand. Second, even Christ’s chosen twelve are dumbfounded. Note the reaction of the leader of the disciples, St. Peter, when Christ asks them if they too will leave: “And Simon Peter answered him: Lord, to whom shall we go? Thou hast the words of eternal life. And we have believed and have known, that thou art the Christ, the Son of God.” It is their faith in Christ as the Son of God that anchors them to his side, despite the gravity and troubling nature of the discourse they just received.

In the end, the Eucharistic Discourse becomes one of the most important sections of Scripture. It should be a mainstay for all Catholics and a source of contemplation Catholics return to often. If you have not read it, please take the time to do so.2

 

14 Memes on the Holy Eucharist

 

Eucharist Adoration Meme

 

Eucharist Meme 8

 

Eucharist Meme 7

 

Eucharist Meme 4

 

Eucharist Meme 9

 

Eucharist Meme 1

 

Eucharist Meme 2

 

Eucharist Meme 6

 

Eucharist Meme 5

 

Eucahrist

 

Eucharist Meme 14

 

Eucahrist Meme 15

 

Eucharsit Meme Cartoon

  1. Eucharistic Discourse: All Scripture citations are taken from the Douay-Rheims Catholic Bible. While the entirety of John six is important for context, the Eucharistic Discourse is generally considered to be verses 31-71. []
  2. Eucharistic Discourse Sources: Catholic Answers has an article entitled, What Catholics Believe About John 6 and another entitled, Christ in the Eucharist. Both are helpful. The excellent blog Shameless Popery has a meticulous article explaining why Christ was being literal in John six. SPL has a basic but foundational list on the Eucharist entitled, 46 Basic Questions on the Holy Eucharist taken from the Baltimore Catechism. []

The 10 Authentic Trappist Monk Beers

In 1997, eight Trappist abbeys founded the International Trappist Association (ITA) to prevent non-Trappist commercial companies from abusing the Trappist name. Today there are only 10 authentic Trappist ales in the world.

Logo of the International Trappist Association

International Trappist Association & Standards

In 1997, eight Trappist abbeys—six from Belgium (Orval, Chimay, Westvleteren, Rochefort, Westmalle and Achel), one from the Netherlands (Koningshoeven) and one from Germany (Mariawald) – founded the International Trappist Association (ITA) to prevent non-Trappist commercial companies from abusing the Trappist name. This private association created a logo that is assigned to goods (cheese, beer, wine, etc.) that respect precise production criteria. For the beers, these criteria are the following:

  1. The beer must be brewed within the walls of a Trappist abbey, by or under control of Trappist monks.
  2. The brewery, the choices of brewing, and the commercial orientations must obviously depend on the monastic community.
  3. The economic purpose of the brewery must be directed toward assistance and not toward financial profit.

This association has a legal standing, and its logo gives to the consumer some information and guarantees about the produce.1

 

The Authentic Trappist Product Ales

 

Westmalle Logo via Westmalle Brewery

1. Westmalle

The Trappist abbey in Westmalle (officially called Abdij Onze-Lieve-Vrouw van het Heilig Hart van Jezus) was founded 6 June 1794, but the community was not elevated to the rank of Trappist abbey until 22 April 1836. Martinus Dom, the first abbot, decided the abbey would brew its own beer, and the first beer was brewed on 1 August 1836 and first imbibed on 10 December 1836. The pioneer brewers were Father Bonaventura Hermans and Albericus Kemps.

The first beer was described as light in alcohol and rather sweet. By 1856, the monks had added a second beer: the first strong brown beer. This brown beer is today considered the first double (dubbel, in Dutch). The current Dubbel is derived from a recipe first brewed in 1926. Local sales began in 1856 and the oldest registered sale was on 1 January 1861. The brewery was enlarged and rebuilt in 1865 based on the example set by the Trappists of Forges (nearby Chimay). Father Ignatius van Ham joined the brewer team. Further commercialisation and sales to traders commenced in 1921.

In 1933 a complete new brewery was built and in 1934, the brewery brewed a strong pale ale of 9.5% abv giving it the name Tripel – the first modern use of the name. The brewery was remodeled in 1991. It currently has a bottling capacity of 45,000 bottles per hour, and yearly output of 120,000 hL (in 2004). The majority of the workers in the brewery are no longer monks, but secular staff brought in from outside. There are 22 monks and 40 outside staff.2

 

The abbey of Saint Sixtus of Westvleteren via The Official Website

2. Westvleteren

Trappist monks from the Catsberg monastery, located in France, founded the St Sixtus monastery in 1831. In 1838, the brewing at Westvleteren commenced. In 1850, some of the monks founded the Notre-Dame de Scourmont monastery, which also brews a Trappist beer. During World Wars I and II, the Westvleteren brewery continued to operate, albeit at a lower capacity. The brewery was the only Trappist one to retain the copper vessels throughout the wars—the other breweries had the copper salvaged by the Germans for their war efforts.

In WWI this was primarily due to the abbey not being occupied by the Germans, but instead was caring for wounded allied troops. In 1931, the abbey began selling beer to the general public, having only served beer to guests and visitors up until that time. In 1946, the St. Bernardus brewery in nearby Watou was granted a licence to brew beer under the St Sixtus name. This agreement ended in 1992; St. Bernardus still brews beers of similar styles, but under their own name. That same year, the abbey opened its new brewery to replace the older equipment.

The brewery currently employs three secular workers for various manual labour tasks, however the primary brewing is done by the monks only. It is the only Trappist brewery where the monks still do all of the brewing. Of the 26 Cistercians who reside at the abbey, five monks run the brewery, with an additional five who assist during bottling.

In June 2005, when Westvleteren 12 was again highlighted as “Best Beer in the World” in a bi-annual competition on RateBeer.com, news organizations followed this up and articles appeared in the international press, highlighting the beer ranking and the unusual business policies.3

 

Achel Trappist Ale via Crossroads Magazine

3. Achel

Achel brewery or Brouwerij der Sint-Benedictusabdij de Achelse Kluis is a Belgian Trappist brewery, and the smallest of the seven currently approved Trappist breweries. It is located in the Abbey of Saint Benedict in the Belgian municipality of Achel. It brews five trappist beers.

The history of the brewery goes back to 1648, when Dutch monks built a chapel in Achel. The chapel became an abbey in 1686, but was destroyed during the period of the French Revolution. In 1844, the ruins were rebuilt by monks from Westmalle, and various farming activities began. The first beer to be brewed on the site was the Patersvaatje in 1852, and 19 years later in 1871, the site became a Trappist monastery, with beer brewing a regular activity.

In 1914 during World War I, the monks left the abbey due to German occupation. The Germans dismantled the brewery in 1917 to salvage the approximately 700 kg of copper. In 1998 the monks decided to begin brewing again. Monks from the Trappist Abbey of Westmalle and Rochefort Abbey assisted in the building of the new brewery. In 2001, the brewery released the Achel 8° beers.

Like all other Trappist breweries, the beers are sold in order to support the monastery and charities.4

 

The Chimay Selection via http://blogs.wvgazette.com/

4. Chimay

Chimay Brewery (“Bières de Chimay”) is a beer brewery in Chimay, southern Hainaut, Belgium. The brewery is located in the Scourmont Abbey, a Trappist monastery, and is one of the seven breweries worldwide that produce Trappist beer. They make three widely distributed ales: Chimay Rouge, Chimay Bleue, and Chimay Blanche; and they make one patersbier exclusively for the monks. The monastery also makes four varieties of cheese.

The brewery was founded inside Scourmont Abbey, in the Belgian municipality of Chimay in 1862. The brewery produces three widely distributed ales and a patersbier exclusively for the monks; they are known as Trappist beers because they are made in a Trappist monastery. It was the first brewery to use the Trappist Ale designation on its labels.

As with all other Trappist breweries, the beer is sold only for financial support of the monastery and good causes. The brewery business pays rent for use of the property within the abbey, which is used to support the monastic community. The majority of the profit from the sale of the beer is distributed to charities and for community development around the region. As of 2007, sales figures for Chimay products exceeded $50 million per year.

The water for the beers is drawn from a well located inside the monastery walls. The filtered solids from the beer mash are recycled into livestock feed which is given to the same cows that produce the milk for Chimay cheeses. The beer is transported from the monastery to the bottling plant 12 km away, which can fill 40,000 bottles per hour, of which many are returns. The beer is then refermented in the bottle for three weeks before being shipped around the world. Fifty percent of Chimay beer production is sold on the export markets.

The brewing plant was updated in 1988, and as of 2005 produced 12 megalitres annually.5

 

The Rochefort Beers via Wikipedia

5. Rochefort

The brewery is located inside the Abbey of Notre-Dame de Saint-Rémy, near the town of Rochefort, and has been brewing beer since 1595. There are approximately 15 monks resident at the monastery. The monks are very secretive about the brewing process and the brewery is not open to the public, therefore much of the information publicly known about the brewery comes from only a few sources.

Like many strong Belgian beers, those produced at Rochefort age well and can be cellared for at least five years whilst maintaining quality. Each of these beers is brewed to the same recipe, with the only difference being the alcoholic content.The water for the beers is drawn from a well located inside the monastery walls.

As with all other Trappist breweries, the beer is only sold in order to financially support the monastery and some other charitable causes. The monks will not increase production based on demand or profit motives, but only enough to support themselves, resulting in a fairly limited supply of beer. In practice, there is currently no shortage through regular channels.6

 

Orval via flickr Bernt Rostad

6. Orval

Orval Brewery (French: Brasserie d’Orval) is a Belgian trappist brewery located within the walls of the Abbaye Notre-Dame d’Orval in the Gaume region of Belgium. The brewery produces two beers, which are marketed as trappist beer, Orval and Petite Orval.

Evidence of brewing goes back to the earliest days of the monastery. A document written by the abbot in 1628 directly refers to the consumption of beer and wine by the monks. The last of the brewers to be a monk was Brother Pierre, up until the 1793 fire. In 1931 the present day brewery was built, employing lay people and intended to provide a source of funds for the monastery reconstruction. It was designed by Henry Vaes, who also designed the distinctive Orval beer glass. The first beer was shipped from the brewery on 7 May 1932, and was sold in barrels rather than the bottles of today. Orval was the first Trappist beer to be sold nationally around Belgium.7

 

Koningshoeven Beers via Wikipedia: Ludovic Péron

7. Koningshoeven

De Koningshoeven Brewery (Brouwerij de Koningshoeven) is a Dutch Trappist brewery founded in 1884 within the walls of the abbey Onze Lieve Vrouw van Koningshoeven in Berkel-Enschot (near Tilburg).

The abbey opened a brewery inside the monastery in 1884 in order to finance the monastery and contribute to charitable causes. Despite this goal, the brewery was run as a commercial enterprise. The abbey owned several bars in the area and produced lager under its own “Trappist” brand as well as contract brewing for several private labels. In 1969, the abbey licensed the brewing operations to the Artois Brewery (now InBev). In 1980 the deal with Artois ended, and the monks went back to brewing themselves, this time a top fermented beer which had been made in limited quantities since 1950s only. Over time the brewery introduced more varieties, first with Dubbel and Tripel in 1987, then in 1992 they introduced Blond. Between 1993 and 2000, the brewery also marketed a brand called Enkel. The brewery also produces the world’s only Trappist witbier. The brewery also used to produce the Jopen beer.The brewery started exporting in 1985, and in 1989 the brewery was modernised.

From 1980 until 1999, the brewery was largely run by the monks. Due to the difficulty of the ageing monks continuing to operate the brewery, a limited liability company was set up as a subsidiary of the large commercial brewer, Bavaria. In 1999 the new company began to take over day to day operations, renting the buildings and equipment from the abbey.

As a result of this agreement, a dispute arose with the International Trappist Association, the body that governs the labelling of goods as Trappist. They claimed that this new method of operation was against the regulations that permitted the beer to display the Authentic Trappist Product logo. Whilst the beer continued to be brewed within the abbey walls, the arrangement with Bavaria was felt to be too commercialised. As a result, the brewery withdrew their use of the logo on 1 December 1999. However, the brewery continued to label the beer as Trappistenbier.

After a lengthy study by all parties, and a review of the agreement between the abbey and brewery, the beers were granted the right to display the logo again as of September 9, 2005. As part of this settlement, the monks have taken a more active control of the brewery day to day operations, working several hours each day.8

 

This post was updated on December 20, 2013 to include three new additions to the official list of Trappist Ales. The list was originally posted August 11, 2011.

 

Stiftskirche von Engelszell by Gerhard Anzinger, Wels via Wikipedia.
Stiftskirche von Engelszell by Gerhard Anzinger, Wels via Wikipedia.

8. Stift Engelszell

Stift Engelszell Trappist AleIn 2012, the Abbey of Engelszell in Engelhartszell, Austria started a their own brewery and began production of their unique Trappist ales: Gregorius and Benno. The Austrian abbey received permission to use the “Authentic Trappist Product” logo the same year. According to the official website, the first brew was the Gregorius and is a dark triple sitting at 9.7% Alc. Production on the Gregorius began in June 1, 2012 with the second variety following on May, 30, 2013. The second beer, Benno, is a bright Dubbel style beer sitting at 6.9% Alc.

The abbey was founded in 1293 by Bernhard of Prambach, Bishop of Passau, as a Cistercian monastery. In 1786, Engelszell was dissolved by Emperor Joseph II and the buildings were subsequently put to several secular uses, including as a factory and as a residence.

In 1925, Engelszell was occupied and re-founded as a Trappist monastery by refugee German monks expelled after World War I from Oelenberg Abbey in Alsace. These monks had found temporary shelter in Banz Abbey but were looking for a permanent home. Initially established as a priory, in 1931 it was elevated to the rank of an abbey, and the former prior, Gregorius Eisvogel, appointed abbot, in which office he was dedicated by Johannes Maria Gföllner, Bishop of Linz, at a ceremony in Wilhering Abbey. On 2 December 1939, the abbey was confiscated by the Gestapo and the community, numbering 73, evicted. Four monks were sent to Dachau Concentration Camp, while others were imprisoned elsewhere or drafted into the Wehrmacht. At the end of the war in 1945, only about a third of the previous community returned. They were augmented, however, by the refugee German Trappists expelled from Mariastern Abbey, Banja Luka, Bosnia, under their abbot Bonaventura Diamant.

The monastery lives mostly from its agricultural produce. It has become known both for its liqueurs and for its cheese, Engelszeller Trappistenkäse. In May 2012, the International Trappist Association approved Engelszell to be the 8th producer of Trappist beer, and only the second outside of Belgium.9

 

Saint Joseph’s Abbey in Spencer, Mass., is the first American brewery to be manned exclusively by Trappist monks.
Saint Joseph’s Abbey in Spencer, Mass., is the first American brewery to be manned exclusively by Trappist monks.

9. St. Joseph’s Abbey

St. Joseph’s Abbey in Spencer, Massachusetts is the first American monastery to produce an official Trappist Ale and the first outside of Europe. The abbey was awarded the right to use the “Authentic Trappist Product” logo in 2013.

“At a meeting yesterday of the International Trappist Association in Brussels, the Spencer Trappist Ale was awarded the ‘Authentic Trappist Product’ designation,” François de Harenne, Commercial Director of the Orval Trappist brewery, told the Belgian Beer Specialist on Dec. 11.“The decision was made after several controls made on the premises during the last weeks…We also were lucky enough to taste the beer.”

According to the official website of the brewery, “Our recipe was inspired by the traditional refectory ales known as patersbier (“fathers’ beer” in Flemish). These sessionable beers are brewed by the monks for their dinner table and are typically only available at the monastery. Spencer is a full-bodied, golden-hued ale with fruity accents, a dry finish and light hop bitterness. The beer is unfiltered and unpasteurized, preserving live yeast that naturally carbonates the beer in the bottle and keg, and contributes to the beer flavor and aroma.” The beer will sit at 6.5% Alc.10

 

Abdij Maria Toevlucht Trappist Monastery.
Abdij Maria Toevlucht Trappist Monastery.

10. Abdij Maria Toevlucht

The Maria Toevlucht Trappist Abbey received permission in December 2013 to use the “Authentic Trappist Product” logo alongside the Trappist Abbey in Spencer, Massachusetts.

The official website does confirms a brewery has been constructed and the monastery has been accepted into the “Trappist market.”11


 

More List on Beer & Wine from St. Peter’s List:

  1. [Source] [ITA] []
  2. [Source] [Westmalle Website] []
  3. [Source] [Westvletern] []
  4. [Source] [Achel] []
  5. [Source] [Chimay] []
  6. [Source] [Rochefort] []
  7. [Source] [Orval] []
  8. [Source] [Koningshoeven] []
  9. Stift Engelszell: The official website in German is Stift Engelszell. The history of the monastery is quoted from the Wikipedia article. []
  10. Spencer: There are two notable websites for Spencer. First the Official Spencer Brewery Website and the St. Joseph’s Abbey Website. The quote from the Belgian Beer Specialist is taken from the FOX News article US to Open First Trappist monk brewery Outside of Europe. []
  11. Maria Toevlucht: The official website of Maria Toevlucht. []

13 Memes on Catholicism & Science

Listers, “faith and reason are like two wings on which the human spirit rises to the contemplation of truth.”

Listers, “faith and reason are like two wings on which the human spirit rises to the contemplation of truth.” The opening line of Pope John Paul II’s Fides et Ratio embodies the Catholic belief that faith and reason must be harmonious. Extending that harmony to their various bodies of knowledge, Sacred Doctrine and the empirical sciences must also harmonize. There is only one God. The same God who inspired Holy Scripture is the same God who wrote the laws of reality. The actual way in which they harmonize, however, can be a monumental task at times. SPL has collected 30 quotes that demonstrate the history of Catholicism and evolution, and the list stands as a great exemplar of the dialogue between the Faith and the sciences. And while a meme does not serve to explain the relationship between faith and reason, it can work as a humorous way to dispel caricatural notions of Catholicism being anti-science.

 

Memes and More

 

Genetics meme monk
Gregor Johann Mendel (July 20, 1822– January 6, 1884) was a German-speaking Silesian scientist and Augustinian friar who gained posthumous fame as the founder of the new science of genetics. – Wikipedia

 

Hospital Meme

 

Science Catholic meme

 

Wonka Science Meme

 

Barron not impressed meme

 

Catholic Sceince Meme 3
Roger Bacon, O.F.M. (c. 1214–1294) (scholastic accolade Doctor Mirabilis, meaning “wonderful teacher”), was an English philosopher and Franciscan friar who placed considerable emphasis on the study of nature through empirical methods. – Wikipedia

 

Science Sisters meme

 

Big Bang Graphic

 

Big Bang Theory Meme

 

Jesuit Big Bang Meme 2

 

Faith and Science meme

 

Jesuits moon meme

 

God wrote Science meme

 

What other Catholic scientist memes should we add? Let us know.

Blessed Beer is the Best Beer: 10 Photos of Delicious Monk-Made Ale

Bless, + O Lord, this creature beer, which thou hast deigned to produce from the fat of grain.

Listers, bless O Lord this creature beer! The following photos are ones taken by our staff and one you’ve seen in on Facebook & Twitter. All of the featured beers below are official Trappist Ales made by monks and registered with the International Trappist Association.

I would like a great lake of beer for the King of Kings.
St. Brigid of Ireland

Another fantastic quote on Catholicism and beer comes from fanciful mind of G.K. Chesterton, “In Catholicism, the pint, the pipe and the Cross can all fit together.” As always, if you have a picture of some tasty beer made by monks, don’t hesitate to send it in.

More from St. Peter’s List:

Also, please remember that blessed beer is the best beer. “Bless, + O Lord, this creature beer, which thou hast deigned to produce from the fat of grain: that it may be a salutary remedy to the human race, and grant through the invocation of thy holy name; that, whoever shall drink it, may gain health in body and peace in soul. Through Christ our Lord.” Amen.

 

 

2012-07-01_1341163981

 

2012-07-01_1341175248

 

2012-07-02_1341194685

 

2012-07-19_1342666060

 

2012-12-12_1355355916

 

2013-08-08_1375981066

 

2013-03-31_1364753299

 

2013-08-10_1376101130

 

2012-11-16_1353088248

 

Trappist Ale Pittsburgh

 

Email your photos of delicious monk-made ale to SPL. Cheers!

Aquinas is Not Impressed: 12 Memes of the Angelic Doctor

Pope Leo XIII once said that St. Thomas Aquinas was “like the sun, he heated the world with the warmth of his virtues and filled it with the splendor of his teaching.”

A Selection of Lists on St. Thomas Aquinas

Listers, Pope Leo XIII once said that St. Thomas Aquinas was “like the sun, he heated the world with the warmth of his virtues and filled it with the splendor of his teaching.”1  He has been lauded by Pope Benedict XVI as having “an exquisitely Eucharistic soul.”2 Even in his time, Pope Pius X claimed that the Summa Theologica  “should never have been allowed to fall into disuse” and that those who have stepped away from the work have “exposed themselves to grave risk.”3 Despite what happened after Vatican II, the Council actually called for the Angelic Doctor to be held in high esteem and taught throughout the Roman Catholic Church.4 Father Robert Barron has claimed renewing the study of St. Thomas Aquinas will renew the Church.5

Our Church is suffering what is arguably the greatest catechetical crisis since the Protestant Reformation. Our Saints and Popes call out for the Roman Catholic Church to turn back to her Universal Doctor. In the midst of this serious subject of renewal, please enjoy these lighthearted memes. Please also check out the above lists that catalogue the magnificent teachings of Aquinas. For the renewal of the Church, we pray to the Lord.

 

Aquinas Meme 1

 

Aquinas Meme 2

Aquinas Meme 3

 

Aquinas Meme 4

 

Aquinas Meme 10

 

Aquinas Meme 5

 

Aquinas Meme 6

Aquinas Meme 7

Aquinas Meme 8

 

Aquinas Meme 9

 

Aquinas Philosopher Meme

 

Aquinas Birdhouse Meme

  1. List of quotes from Aeterni Patris, Pope Leo XIII. []
  2. Catechesis on Aquinas by Pope Benedict XVI. []
  3. Pope Pius X’s exhortation to study St. Thomas Aquinas. []
  4. What Vatican II actually said about St. Thomas Aquinas. []
  5. Renew the study of Aquinas to renew the Church: Fr. Robert Barron. []

4 Ways to Save Your Soul on a College Campus

The Eucharist is the “source and summit of the Christian life” and there is no greater way to grow in faith and grace than feeding on the Bread of Life.

Listers, with an increasingly hostile and secular society, Catholics find themselves each day becoming more countercultural. Young people with a sincere heart who wish to follow Christ and keep the commands of Holy Mother Church, will find that living a true Catholic lifestyle can be difficult and lonely in a culture that no longer upholds Christendom.

College campuses are no doubt breeding grounds for the secular culture. Literally. Even students who find themselves at a Catholic university will face challenges to their faith. So how does one save his soul while at college surrounded by a culture that abuses drugs, sex, contraception, abortion, alcohol and has little faith?

 

1. A Liberal Arts Education

If you find yourself enrolled in college, you probably want to get an education. Resist the temptation to pursue degrees aimed at finding a job. Yes, a job is important and good, but college is a time to “build walls, not to keep people in, but to keep the world out.” [1] It is a time to contemplate the higher things of life, your place in the world and your eternal end. Do not become obsessed with grades, internships and job searches. “Keep the world out” and take advantage of the only opportunity to contemplate the essential questions of life without the pressures of the working world. Furthermore, resist all temptations to enroll in easy courses with laid-back professors.

A liberal arts education is meant to be challenging and intellectually stimulating. Find professors who do not merely “teach” their students or talk at them, but rather ones who engage in a dialogue with students. Socrates, the greatest teacher in Western history, never gave lengthy lectures. He instead pondered questions with those around him and helped to guide his students along the way. Once you discover professors who engage the best that has been written and taught in the West, stick with them, regardless of what classes they teach. One cannot live the faith sincerely without first learning it. There is no better way of unlocking the rich intellectual tradition of the Church than by studying the liberal arts. A great way to find out how to learn while in college is to read Another Sort of Learning by Fr. James V. Schall, S.J.

 

2. Community

Friendships matter. Indeed the Philosopher devotes two books to the importance of friendship. [2] It is imperative to find a community of friends who live out the Catholic faith. These communities will help support and foster both faith and virtue. A good place to start at a non-Catholic school would be the Newman Center. Organizations such as the Knights of Columbus, Catholic Daughters of America, Daughters of Isabella, FOCUS and other faith-based groups are a great place to find friendship. Additionally, get involved with service projects even if they are sponsored by a secular organization. Finding friends and providing a witness to Christ through works of mercy is a rewarding experience for all involved. Finally, do not limit yourself to groups within the university. Many religious orders and dioceses run young adult ministries across the country. And if you can’t find any groups, start one yourself!

 

3. Attend Daily Mass & Frequent Confession

The Eucharist is the “source and summit of the Christian life”[3] and there is no greater way to grow in faith and grace than feeding on the Bread of Life. Daily Mass will become a center point for your college life and will order your day toward God. For many people, college was the only opportunity to attend to attend daily Mass and holy hour without the interference and stress of work life. Finally, go often to confession and keep your soul clean and fervent.

 

4. Prayer, Devotionals and Confraternities

Prayer is our weapon and shield against the Evil One. It is our link to God. Look to the Gospel and find Jesus going out often to pray. We must follow our Savior and do the same. I encourage you to enroll in spiritual confraternities such as the Angelic Warfare Confraternity, Confraternity of the Most Holy Rosary and practice devotionals such as True Devotion to Mary. Most of all grow in love of our Blessed Mother who will always lead us to her Son. Mary is the surest path to Jesus. Pray the Rosary daily.

 

Listers, college is a time to either find God and belong more deeply to Him, or, to turn away from the faith and adopt the currents of the world. Hold firm to these four points. Pope Francis urges the young to “swim against the tide.”[4] Keep in mind that the temptations and trails will never leave. As G.K. Chesterton said, “The Christian ideal has not been tried and found wanting. It has been found difficult and left untried.”

May Mary our Mother, intercede on our behalf and lead us to her Son all the days of our life.

St. Thomas Aquinas, patron of students, pray for us!

 

Louis Cona Profile

Louis Cona is an undergraduate at Georgetown University studying Government and Philosophy. He serves and coordinates the Traditional Latin Mass on campus and is an active member of the Georgetown Knights of Columbus.

 

 

 

 

[1] James V. Schall, S.J. – Georgetown Voice

[2] Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics.

[3] Catechism of the Catholic Church, no. 1324

[4] Pope Francis, April 28th, 2013 Confirmation Mass for Young People: CNA.

12 Political Cartoons Featuring Pope Francis

12 selected political cartoons featuring Pope Francis.

Memes and More

 

Francis Cartoon 11

Francis cartoon 1

Francis Cartoon 2

Francis Cartoon 3

Francis Cartoon 5

Francis Cartoon 6

Francis Cartoon 7

Francis Cartoon 7

Francis Cartoon 8

Francis Cartoon 9

a new shepherd sends a signal on environmental protection

Francis Cartoon 4

15 Catholic Memes from Catholic Gag

“Augustine says (Music. ii, 15): ‘I pray thee, spare thyself at times: for it becomes a wise man sometimes to relax the high pressure of his attention to work.’ Now this relaxation of the mind from work consists in playful words or deeds.”

Listers, in his seminal Summa Theologica, our Angelic Doctor states the following on playful deeds and humor:

Augustine says (Music. ii, 15): “I pray thee, spare thyself at times: for it becomes a wise man sometimes to relax the high pressure of his attention to work.” Now this relaxation of the mind from work consists in playful words or deeds. Therefore it becomes a wise and virtuous man to have recourse to such things at times. Moreover the Philosopher [Ethic. ii, 7; iv, 8 assigns to games the virtue of eutrapelia, which we may call “pleasantness.” – ST II-II 168.A2

Catholic Gag is full of  “playful words and deeds” that may relax the virtuous mind. Catholic Gag is self-described as a site “with Catholic memes, quotes, ecards, videos, etc. We are about fun, education, apologetics, evangelization and much more…” SPL has selected fifteen images and if you enjoy these memes and want to see more please be sure to “Like” Catholic Gag’s Facebook page. Cheers.

 

Memes and More

 

 

Fulton Sheen Meme 2

Moses Vegan

Forgive me Father Boring

Valley of Death

St Anthony Meme

Pope Francis BXVI Meme

Mass Priest Meme

Fulton Sheen Meme

Chesterton Quote Meme

Catholic Dating Meme

Vatican II Meme

Trappist Meme Beer Monk

Priest Feminists

Escriva Meme

Chesterton Red Meme

5 Pope Francis Facebook Cover Images

SPL has created five Facebook Cover images with particularly potent quotes from His Holiness Pope Francis. Enjoy.

Listers, be proud to be Catholic and be proud of our Holy Father Pope Francis. In honor of His Holiness Pope Francis ascending to the Apostolic Throne of St. Peter, SPL proudly presents five Facebook Cover images. Please pray for our Roman Pontiff that he would be an advocate of peace, an advocate for the poor, and the Advocate of Christian Memory holding Catholicism to Sacred Tradition. St. Francis, pray for us and Pope Francis.

More Graphics, FB Covers, & Memes

 

Instructions
Click on any image below to download the full-quality version to use on your Facebook profile or download them all as a .zip archive.

 

Pope Francis Facebook Cover Image - True Power Quote

 

 

Pope Francis Facebook Cover Image - St Francis Quote

 

 

Pope Francis Facebook Cover Image - Coat of Arms and Latin

 

 

Pope Francis Facebook Cover Image - Communion Quote

 

 

Pope Francis Facebook Cover Image - Habemus Papam

Disapproving Joe Biden: 5 Memes from Pope Francis’ Inaugural Mass

A few comment on Vice President Joe Biden’s mood at His Holiness Pope Francis’ papal inaugural mass.

Listers, on the Solemnity of St. Joseph 2013 His Holiness Pope Francis celebrated his inauguration to the Petrine Ministry. In his expected style, Pope Francis charmed the crowd by stopping the popemobile to kiss a baby and bless a handicapped man. His Holiness’ homily spoke of the poor and weakest amongst us to the delegations from over 130 countries and hundreds of thousands of people. Everyone described their experience of the papal inauguration as a joyous experience. Well, almost everyone.

 

Vice President Joe Biden in the crowd at the Papal Inaugural Mass 2013.1

 

Joe Biden not impressed

 

Joe Biden Catholicism

 

Joe Biden Rome

 

Joe Biden Liturgical Dancers

 

Joe Biden Latin

 

Listers, we post these in good nature and simple fun. If you have a caption you think is good add it to the comment box and it may become a meme! We’ve posted more memes and photos of Pope Francis at 30 Memes and Photos to Love and Share and some of his more notable quotes as a Cardinal at Quotes from Cardinal Bergoglio on 7 Moral Topics. Cheers. 

 

  1. ORIGINAL PHOTO: SPL does not take any credit for the original photo of VP Joe Biden. []

3 Catholic Coffee Companies Online

Listers, you’re probably familiar with the concept of Christian coffeehouses, and chances are that you’ve seen one or possibly even stepped into one. Christian Coffeehouses are usually locally owned and operated cafés that promote Christianity through Christian music, events, speakers, and sometimes keep a minister of some kind on staff. Though smaller in number, there are also a few Catholic coffeehouses throughout the country, e.g. St. James Coffee. More recently, the advent of online coffee shops has begun, and the Christian coffeehouse has found its way to the web.

Christianity has promoted the drinking of coffee since AD 1600 even though coffee originally finds its origin in within Islamic culture. Since Islamic law prohibits the drinking of beverages fermented from fruit or grain Muslims were drinking coffee, while Christians were busy drinking wine and beer. It is said that Pope Clement VIII is responsible for coffee’s rise to fame. In AD 1600 Clement declared, much to the chagrin of the opponents of coffee, “Why, this Satan’s drink is so delicious that it would be a pity to let the infidels have exclusive use of it. We shall cheat Satan by baptizing it, and making it a truly Christian beverage.” Subsequently, coffee has found its place within Western culture, and Christianity. For More on the history of coffee click here.

So grab your SPL coffee mug, Listers, and read on. Here is the list of Catholic coffee online:

 

1. Mystic Monk Coffee


Leading the way in Catholic Coffee, Mystic Monk is coffee brand operated by the Carmelite Monks of Wyoming. At their monastery near Cody, Wyo., the monks roast the coffee themselves as part of their daily manual labor. They are a newer, traditional community of Carmelite monks. They were founded in 2003 and maintain the use of the traditional Latin liturgy of the Carmelite Rite. Every purchase of coffee brings the monks close to building their new monastery. If you’re interested in seeing their plans, brace yourself for awesomeness and then, click here.

Not only do the monks at Mystic Monk Coffee sell coffee, they also sell high quality teas and religious goods. So, after you’ve filled your SPL mug with Mystic Monk Coffee, you can use that time to pray using your rosary from the very same monks. If you’re into using the time it takes you to drink coffee to increase spiritually, you should like this next company.

 

2. HIS Coffee Co.

Bringing Catholic Coffee back in touch with its roots, this Christian coffee company founded by a Roman Catholic deacon and his wife, promotes the Christian life through Coffee drinking. Their philosophy is that in the 10-20 min. it takes you to drink your morning cup of coffee, you could be increasing in your spiritual life through contemplative reading of the bible, prayer, spiritual reading, and other such activities that promote a relationship with God.  “HIS Coffee Company is taking this ‘very-developed’ daily habit of drinking coffee, and weaving in the ‘under-developed’ habit of Christian study and prayer so that they become one daily activity.”

Additionally, both HIS Coffee Co. and the next online coffee company in our list are can assist you in your fundraising needs.

 

3. HeBrews Café

Is a Christian based organization whose missions is to “help churches and other organizations setup and operate HeBrews Café coffee bars within their establishments.” Their vision encourages the communal life in places of peace and tranquility, enjoying life and good coffee. Based in BC, Canada,  HeBrews Café sells beans roasted by Canterbury Coffee Specialty Coffee Roasters. Though they are not a Catholic company, HeBrews Café allows a way for Catholic parishes to organize and set up their own Catholic coffeehouse atmosphere, and so, what isn’t explicitly Catholic to begin with, has every potential to be Catholic in every sense of the word.

 

More “Life & Leisure” from SPL:

More lists from Abram:

You Do Not Stand Alone: 14 Photos from the Lister Community

They come from all walks of life. Whether its discussing the real presence of Christ in the Eucharist over a hearty Trappist ale or soaking in the ancient wisdom of our Common Doctor St. Thomas Aquinas whilst managing five small children, the lister seeks to live the good life, the Catholic life, and share that wondrous existence with others.

Listers, the Catholic life is the good life. Thank you to all those who have recently sent in photographs of how you stand for Holy Mother Church. What is a lister, you ask? Well, listers seek to live the good and virtuous life by pursuing the riches of Christ and his Church. They come from all walks of life. Whether its discussing the real presence of Christ in the Eucharist over a hearty Trappist ale or soaking in the ancient wisdom of our Common Doctor St. Thomas Aquinas whilst managing five small children, the lister seeks to live the good life, the Catholic life, and share that wondrous existence with others.

“Better to illuminate than merely to shine, to deliver to others contemplated truths than merely to contemplate.”
The Angelic Doctor, St. Thomas Aquinas

Have a photo to share? Send it to us and we’ll add it to the next list of photos from the lister community.1 SPL cannot thank the listers enough. We are a small group of volunteers that bring you daily news, original graphics, and articles cataloguing the Catholic faith. We could not do this without all the support you’ve given us. Please follow us on Twitter and like our Facebook page. Be sure to also check out the SPL Store for all our Catholic products and the list of Catholic graphics that started it all – I Stand with the Catholic Church: 10 Graphics in Defense of the Church.

 

Christmastide! Thanks to Leslie.

 

More evidence of Leslie’s excellent taste in coffee mugs.

 

Deo Gratias! Thanks to Erik and his support of Holy Mother Church.

 

Thanks to our Canadian lister Joe!

 

Thanks to Maggie and her family who used SPL graphics to protest the Obama Administration.

 

Thanks to our listers in Atlanta.

 

Listers at the Summer 2012 Religious Liberty Rally in downtown Tulsa, Oklahoma.

 

His Excellency Bishop Slattery of Tulsa, Oklahoma standing in front of an SPL graphic at a religious liberty rally. We’re counting him as a lister.

 

With love from Pittsburgh.

 

Thanks to Michele who’s fighting the good fight in Wisconsin.

 

A lister who knows an “unjust law is no law.”

 

Once again Maggie’s family representing the listers – this time with Scott Hahn.

 

Catholic evangelist Steve Ray having the opportunity to meet a lister.

 

No one needs to tell this man that the Catholic life is the good life. He has it figured out.

 

  1. Lister Photos: Please send photos to salve@stpeterslist.com – please know your photo may be used in a list, on our online store, etc. We will block out license plates and respect personal information. Thank you so much to those who have already sent in photographs. SPL is appreciative of your support. []

14 Photos of a Procession Celebrating the 95th Anniversary of Our Lady of Fatima

St. Benedict’s parish (Chesapeake, VA) celebrated the 95th anniversary of the Fatima apparition. With several parishes from the area we marched a Eucharistic procession from Star of the Sea Catholic Church to the 17th St. Park in Virginia Beach.

Listers, we received the follow gallery of photos back in October from a lister in Chesapeake, Virginia. She writes:

 

St. Benedict’s parish (Chesapeake, VA) celebrated the 95th anniversary of the Fatima apparition. With several parishes from the area we marched a Eucharistic procession from Star of the Sea Catholic Church to the 17th St. Park in Virginia Beach. We prayed the rosary and sang hymns both ways, and at the park heard a small message from each priest (Frs. Nichols and Byrne from our church, and Fr. Novokowsky from Star of the Sea). It’s the first of an annual tradition.

 

SPL has written on Our Lady of Fatima and her sayings to the Faithful in Nossa Senhora do Rosário de Fátima: 4 Things You Must Know About Our Lady of Fatima.

 

8 Prayers to Help You through the Workday.

Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being loved…
From the desire of being extolled …
From the desire of being honored …
From the desire of being praised …

Listers, Ora et Labora (“Pray and Work” to the layman), the motto of the Benedictine order shouldn’t just be used for those called to the consecrated life, but it needs to be ascribed for all Catholics in every walk of life, especially those in the workforce. I recently entered into the realm of the working mother, and I can honestly say that I have never been so busy in all my life. Being a working mother I have discovered that balancing the various duties I have between work and home can drive a woman to the point of screaming at the top of her lungs “SERENITY NOW!!!!” (If you are a Seinfeld fan you know what I am talking about).

I realize that this is not a original revelation, but I certainly never had to experience it firsthand until now. Don’t get me wrong, I love my job, and I really love being a wife and mother, but in between the sales reports, the housecleaning, the emails, the volunteering at my boys’ school, the texts, the cooking, the phone calls, etc. I found it hard to be present in the moment without wondering what I have to do next. I found that my prayer life suffered heinously because even if I made time to pray I worried about all the other tasks I had to do while I prayed. This is not the best mindset to have when trying to have quiet time with God. Clearly my priorities were out of order, because I was treating prayer time as something I squeezed into my schedule rather than making prayer the centerpiece of my existence. Quite simply, I was not living a liturgical life, and I suffered for it. I started looking into prayers that I could incorporate throughout the day to keep me focused on God. Here is what I found (This prayer list is constantly growing, so if you have any recommendations, LISTERS, please list them):

1. To Start Your Day: “Good Morning, Heavenly Father”

Offering your day up to the Lord is an exceptional way to start your day. I try to say this along with the Angelus when I wake up, so that I start my day with a humble heart

Thank You dear Lord,
for protecting and preserving me during the night
and for giving me this new day.
Good morning Heavenly Father,
and thank you for the glory of the sun.
And thank you for the health I have to get my duty done.
I shall devout the hours of this golden day to You,
by honoring Your Holy Name in everything I do.
I shall pursue my daily art without complaint or fear
and spend my every effort to be friendly and sincere.
I know there have been many days that I have wiled away.
But this is one that I will try to make Your special day.
And so once more,
Good Morning Heavenly Father.
And please depend on me
because I want to honour you for all eternity.

Amen.

2. For the Commute: The Rosary

I know that it doesn’t sound like the typical venue for praying the Rosary, but praying the Rosary while driving is a very good thing (just don’t shut your eyes). Instead of filling my head with a bunch lyrics about “calling somebody maybe?” or other such drivel, the Rosary is immensely helpful to start my workday with the Gospel. Also, it helps me from screaming at the so-and-so in the black sedan who just cut me off! If you don’t know how to pray the Rosary, here is a helpful pdf brought to you be by newadvent.org:

3. For When You Sit Down at Your Desk: A Prayer for Success

I just heard about this prayer while I was at sales conference of all places. It struck me as precisely what I need to say when I sit down at my computer to begin my work. It is extremely beautiful. My favorite part is “Show me how to give my best, and let me not despise the toil that is necessary to complete it.” Here are the words:

Almighty God, whose hands hold all matters of life,
give me grace of success in the work that I do.
Help me to give it the careful thought
and the strict attention that will lead to success.
Watch over me and govern my actions,
that I may not mar its perfection.
Show me how to give my best,
and let me not despise the toil that is necessary to complete it.
Make my life a successful one,
in that every duty you give to me,
I do it well.
Give me the blessing of your help and guidance,
and suffer me not to fail.
In Jesus’ name.

Amen.

4. Throughout the day: The Angelus

Odds are most of you, listers, know this prayer by heart, but if you are new to the Catholic world, this is a prayer that will change your life. The Angelus is a prayer that focuses on the Incarnation. It is said three times a day: 6 am, Noon, and 6 pm, so that you can begin, continue, and end your day with Incarnation as the focus of your day. You may find it Latin in SPL’s 8 Prayers Everything Catholic Should Know in Latin and in English here.

5. In Times of Chaos: The Serenity Prayer

I know this prayer is written by Protestant Theologian Reinhold Niebuhr, but that doesn’t mean we can’t take it for our own nor does it mean that words are less true. I use this now and then when everything seems to be going wrong, and when all I want to do is punch a hole through the screen of my laptop. Here are the words:

God, give me grace to accept with serenity
the things that cannot be changed,
Courage to change the things
which should be changed,
and the Wisdom to distinguish
the one from the other.
Living one day at a time,
Enjoying one moment at a time,
Accepting hardship as a pathway to peace,
Taking, as Jesus did,
This sinful world as it is,
Not as I would have it,
Trusting that You will make all things right,
If I surrender to Your will,
So that I may be reasonably happy in this life,
And supremely happy with You forever in the next.
Amen.

6. To Help to Admit when You Have Made a Mistake: The Humility Prayer

Robert Burns says in his poem “To a Mouse” “The best laid plans of mice and men often go awry.” Nothing can be more true yet more irksome to someone who is a perfectionist. I have quite the talent of being organized and take pride that my work is precise and consistent. However, with my tight schedule I do make mistakes. So, when my usually consistent work doesn’t pass muster or if I let something slip through the cracks, I find it hard to admit that I had made a mistake. The old pointer finger is just itching to blame someone else for my own flawed humanity. The Humility Prayer has become my go-to prayer to inoculate me from the folly of pride. Here are the words:

O Jesus! meek and humble of heart, Hear me.
From the desire of being esteemed,
Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being loved…
From the desire of being extolled …
From the desire of being honored …
From the desire of being praised …
From the desire of being preferred to others…
From the desire of being consulted …
From the desire of being approved …
From the fear of being humiliated …
From the fear of being despised…
From the fear of suffering rebukes …
From the fear of being calumniated …
From the fear of being forgotten …
From the fear of being ridiculed …
From the fear of being wronged …
From the fear of being suspected …

That others may be loved more than I,
Jesus, grant me the grace to desire it.

That others may be esteemed more than I …
That, in the opinion of the world,
others may increase and I may decrease …
That others may be chosen and I set aside …
That others may be praised and I unnoticed …
That others may be preferred to me in everything…
That others may become holier than I, provided that I may become as holy as I should…

7. A Prayer for the End of the Day

Eternal Father,
I desire to rest in Thy Heart this night.
I make the intention of offering to Thee
every beat of my heart,
joining to them as many acts of love and desire.
I pray that even while I am asleep,
I will bring back to Thee souls that offend Thee.
I ask forgiveness for the whole world,
especially for those who know Thee and yet sin.
I offer to Thee my every breath and heartbeat
as a prayer of reparation.

Amen.

8. A Prayer to St. Joseph, the Patron Saint of Workers

I am now including a prayer to the Patron Saint of Workers, Saint Joseph. Afterall, no list about work would be complete without him. I think that it is often hard for us “look at our work with the eyes of faith.” I believe if we looked at our work in this way, whatever it may be, then perhaps we might do a better job.

Joseph, by the work of your hands
and the sweat of your brow,
you supported Jesus and Mary,
and had the Son of God as your fellow worker.

Teach me to work as you did,
with patience and perseverance, for God and
for those whom God has given me to support.
Teach me to see in my fellow workers
the Christ who desires to be in them,
that I may always be charitable and forbearing
towards all.

Grant me to look upon work
with the eyes of faith,
so that I shall recognize in it
my share in God’s own creative activity
and in Christ’s work of our redemption,
and so take pride in it.

When it is pleasant and productive,
remind me to give thanks to God for it.
And when it is burdensome,
teach me to offer it to God,
in reparation for my sins
and the sins of the world.

Amen

St. Joseph the Worker, Pray for us!

 

More SPL Lists on Prayer
8 Prayers Every Catholic Should Know in Latin
3 Prayers for Catholic Lawyers
4 Prayers Before You Receive the Eucharist
More lists on prayer…

The Pope on Twitter: All 9 Accounts

“In concise phrases, often no longer than a verse from the Bible, profound thoughts can be communicated – as long as those taking part in the conversation do not neglect to cultivate their own inner lives.” – Pope Benedict XVI

Listers, as of the morning of December 3rd 2012 these are the eight different Twitter handles of His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI. His first tweet will be on December 12th.

“In concise phrases, often no longer than a verse from the Bible, profound thoughts can be communicated – as long as those taking part in the conversation do not neglect to cultivate their own inner lives.” – Pope Benedict XVI

Twitter worked with the Vatican in creating these handles. Vatican Radio asked Twitter’s Director of Social Innovation, Claire Diaz Ortiz, why they worked so diligently with the Vatican to create these handles. She stated, “As a company it’s important for us to have influential leaders and the Pope is perhaps the most important religious leader in the world who’s joining our platform. We’ve seen great work done by other religious leaders in terms of what it means to reach so many people, so we’re eager and hopeful the Pope will be able to connect with believers and non-believers alike.” Mgr Paul Tighe, the Secretary of the Pontifical Council for Social Communications, also stated, “I think symbolically this is very important, this is the head of the Church going into a new digital arena to share his words and ideas…. it’s an encouragement to those already present using Twitter and other forms of social media to reach an even wider group of people…. When the Holy Father is working on sermons or talks he’ll give explicit attention to how to formulate a shorter message that will be tweeted in his name, maybe with the longer Url attached…. it’s really an entry level of engagement…”1

 

The Pope on Twitter – Taken from NEWS.VA

 

1. Benedict XVI

@Pontifex
Welcome to the official Twitter page of His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI

 

2. Benedikt XVI

@Pontifex_de
Willkommen auf der offiziellen Twitter-Seite Sr. Heiligkeit Benedikt XVI

 

3. Benedicto XVI


@Pontifex_es
Bienvenido al Twitter oficial de Su Santidad Benedicto XVI

 

4. Bento XVI


@Pontifex_pt
Bem-vindo ao Twitter oficial de Sua Santidade Papa Bento XVI

 

5. Benedykt XVI


@Pontifex_pl
Witamy na oficjalnej stronie Twitter Jego Świątobliwości Papieża Benedykta XVI

 

6. Benedetto XVI


@Pontifex_it
Benvenuti alla pagina Twitter ufficiale di Sua Santità Benedetto XVI

 

7. Benoît XVI


@Pontifex_fr
Bienvenue sur la page Twitter officielle du Saint Père Benoît XVI

 

8. بندكتس السادس عشر ‏

@Pontifex_ar
أهلاً بكم في الصفحة الرسمية تويتر لقداسة البابا بندكتس السادس عشر

 

[Updated 1-17-13]

9. Benedictus PP. XVI

@Pontifex_ln
Tuus adventus in paginam publicam Summi Pontificis Benedicti XVI breviloquentis optatissimus est.

  1. Vatican Radio quotes – SOURCE []

Lily of the Mohawks: 10 Depictions of Saint Kateri Tekakwitha

The story of Kateri, also known as “Lily of the Mohawks” and “Iroquois Virgin”, is intimately related to the history of the Jesuit mission among the Iroquois First Nation toward the end of the 17th century.

Listers, “The story of Kateri, also known as “Lily of the Mohawks” and “Iroquois Virgin”, is intimately related to the history of the Jesuit mission among the Iroquois First Nation toward the end of the 17th century. The principal documents relating both the life and virtues of the young Iroquois woman and also the devotion of the faithful toward her for over three hundred years are held in the Archive of the Jesuits in Canada.”

“Kateri’s mother, a Christian Algonquin who grew up in Trois-Rivières, had been taken prisoner in 1653 and chosen by a Mohawk chief to be his wife. He lived in Ossernenon, near Auriesville, NY where today there are a shrine to the Jesuit martyr saints Isaac Jogues and René Goupil and to Jean de la Lande and another dedicated to Blessed Kateri. It was here that Kateri was born in 1656. In 1660, an epidemic of smallpox broke out in the community. Her father, mother and younger brother died of the disease. Kateri barely survived, nearly blind and marked for life by heavy scarring on her face, which was left with ugly pockmarks. Her uncle adopted her. She refused two well-do-do men who wanted to marry her and took refuge in solitude and in the memory of the faith of her mother.” For the full story visit Jesuits in English Canada.

Saint Kateri Tekakwitha, pray for us.

 

Statue of Kateri Tekakwitha on the outside of the Basilica of Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupré, near Quebec City. – Wikipedia

 

 

Pope Benedict XVI celebrates the canonization Mass for seven new saints in St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican Oct. 21. Among those canonized were two from North America — St. Kateri Tekakwitha, a Native American born in update New York who died in Canada in 1680, and St. Marianne Cope, who worked with leprosy patients on the Hawaiian island of Molokai. (CNS photo/Paul Haring) (Oct. 21, 2012) See SAINTS-MASS Oct. 21, 2012 and SAINTS-PILGRIMS to come.

 

Following three photos are taken from the blog 10 Kids and a Dog and were photographed at the National Shrine of now Saint Kateri Tekakwitha.

 

 

A carving of the baptism of Saint Kateri Tekakwitha.

 

 

Kateri Tekakwitha in Santa Fe Catholic Cathedral – via wikipedia, Jim McIntosh.

 

A statue of Blessed Kateri Tekakwitha stands amid trees on the grounds of the shrine dedicated to her in Fonda, N.Y., July 14, her U.S. feast day. The 17th-century Mohawk-Algonquin woman became the first member of a North American tribe to be declared a saint when she is canonized Oct. 21. (CNS photo/Nancy Phelan Wiechec) – http://therecordarchlou.wordpress.com/

 

Deborah Amell touches a statue of St. Kateri Tekakwitha after a Mass of thanksgiving celebrated Oct. 21 in her honor at the Shrine of Our Lady of Martyrs in Auriesville, N.Y. Pope Benedict XVI created seven new saints the same day, including St. Kateri, a 16th-century Mohawk-Algonquin woman known as the “Lily of t he Mohawks.” She is regarded as the first Native American saint. (CNS photo/Jason Greene, Reuters) (Oct. 22, 2012) See SAINTS-MASS Oct. 21, 2012.

 

St. Kateri stained glass photo from Canada Jesuits – http://www.jesuits.ca/content/story-blessed-kateri-tekakwitha.

5 “Blessings of the Table” in Both Latin and English

The merciful and compassionate Lord has made a remembrance of his wondrous works. He has given food to those fearing him. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, for ever and ever. Amen.

Listers, “the Benedictiones Mensae are the sung Latin table prayers as used in the Roman and monastic usage.” SPL pulled the following collection from the EWTN collection of Latin prayers and the pictures and opening quote are taken from the New Liturgical Movement. The booklet featured in the photographs is from the Monastery of San Benedetto, Norcia – a monastery that in 2012 started making beer, Deo Gratias. For those interested in learning more about Latin and Latin prayers: SPL’s Collection of Lists on Latin.

 

The “Monks of Norcia” presenting the Holy Father with their newly crafted beer.

 

BENEDICTIONES MENSAE

“Blessings at the Table”
LATIN

1. Ante Prandium

“Before Lunch”

The Priest: Benedicite.
All: Benedicite.

The Priest: Oculi omnium
And all continue: in te sperant, Domine, et tu das illis escam in tempore opportuno. Aperis tu manum tuam, et imples omne animal in benedictione. Gloria Patri, et Filio, et Spiritui Sancto. Sicut erat in principio, et nunc, et semper, et in saecula saeulorum. Amen.

Kyrie eleison.
Christe eleison.
Kyrie eleison.

Pater noster… [continue in silence up to:]
V. Et ne nos inducas in tentationem.
R. Sed libera nos a malo.

The Priest then says: Benedic, Domine, nos et haec tua dona, quae de tua largitate sumus sumpturi. Per Christum Dominum nostrum.
R. Amen.

Then the Lector says: Iube, domne, benedicere.
The Priest: Mensae caelestis participes faciat nos Rex aeternae gloriae.
R. Amen.

 

2. Post Prandium

“After Lunch”

The Lector begins: Tu autem, Domine, miserere nobis.
R. Deo gratias.

All rise. The Priest: Confiteantur tibi, Domine, omnia opera tua.
R. Et sancti tui benedicant tibi. Gloria Patri, et Filio, et Spiritui Sancto. Sicut erat in principio, et nunc, et semper, et in saecula saeculorum. Amen.

The Priest continues: Agimus tibi gratias, omnipotens Deus, pro universis beneficiis tuis: Qui vivis et regnas in saecula saeculorum.
R. Amen.

The following psalm is then said by all: Laudate Dominum, omnes gentes, laudate eum, omnes populi. Quoniam confirmata est super nos misericordia eius et veritas Domini manet in aeternum. Gloria Patri, et Filio, et Spiritui Sancto. Sicut erat in principio, et nunc, et semper, et in saecula saeculorum. Amen.

Kyrie eleison.
Christe eleison.
Kyrie eleison.

Pater noster… [continue in silence up to:]
V. Et ne nos inducas in tentationem.
R. Sed libera nos a malo.
V. Dispersit, dedit pauperibus.
R. Iustitia eius manet in saeculum saeculi.
V. Benedicam Dominum in omni tempore.
R. Semper laus eius in ore meo.
V. In Domino laudabitur anima mea.
R. Audiant mansueti, et laetentur.
V. Magnificate Dominum mecum.
R. Et exaltemus nomen eius in idipsum.
V. Sit nomen Domini benedictum.
R. Ex hoc nunc et usque in saeculum.

The Priest: Retribuere, dignare, Domine, omnibus, nobis bona facientibus propter nomen tuum, vitam aeternam.
R. Amen.

V. Benedicamus Domino.
R. Deo gratias.
V. Fidelium animae per misericordiam Dei requiescant in pace.
R. Amen.

Pater noster… [all in silence]

V. Deus det nobis suam pacem.
R. Amen.

 

3. Ante Coenam

“Before Dinner”

The Priest: Benedicite.
All: Benedicite.

The Priest: Edent pauperes
And all continue: et saturabuntur, et laudabunt Dominum, qui requirunt eum: vivant corda eorum in saeculum saeculi. Gloria Patri, et Filio, et Spiritui Sancto. Sicut erat in principio, et nunc, et semper, et in saecula saeculorum. Amen.

Kyrie eleison.
Christe eleison.
Kyrie eleison.

Pater noster… [continue in silence up to:]
V. Et ne nos inducas in tentationem.
R. Sed libera nos a malo.

The Priest then says: Benedic, Domine, nos et haec tua dona, quae de tua largitate sumus sumpturi. Per Christum Dominum nostrum.
R. Amen.

Then the Lector says: Iube, domne, benedicere.
The Priest: Ad caenam vitae aeternae perducat nos Rex ternae gloriae.
R. Amen.

 

4. In Fine Coenae

“At the End of Dinner”

The Lector begins: Tu autem, Domine, miserere nobis.
R. Deo gratias.

All rise. The Priest: Memoriam fecit mirabilium suorum, misericors et miserator Dominus. Escam dedit timentibus se. Gloria Patri et Filio et Spiritui Sancto. Sicut erat in principio, et nunc et semper, et in saecula saeculorum. Amen.

The Priest continues: Benedictus Deus in donis suis, et sanctus in omnibus operibus suis, qui vivat et regnat in saecula saeculorum. R. Amen.

The following psalm is then said by all: Laudate Dominum, omnes gentes, laudate eum, omnes populi. Quoniam confirmata est super nos misericordia eius et veritas Domini manet in aeternum. Gloria Patri, et Filio, et Spiritui Sancto. Sicut erat in principio, et nunc, et semper, et in saecula saeculorum. Amen.

Kyrie eleison.
Christe eleison.
Kyrie eleison.

Pater noster… [continue in silence up to:]
V. Et ne nos inducas in tentationem.
R. Sed libera nos a malo.
V. Dispersit, dedit pauperibus.
R. Iustitia eius manet in saeculum saeculi.
V. Benedicam Dominum in omni tempore.
R. Semper laus eius in ore meo.
V. In Domino laudabitur anima mea.
R. Audiant mansueti, et laetentur.
V. Magnificate Dominum mecum.
R. Et exaltemus nomen eius in idipsum.
V. Sit nomen Domini benedictum.
R. Ex hoc nunc et useque in saeculum.

The Priest: Retribuere, dignare, Domine, omnibus, nobis bona facientibus propter nomen tuum, vitam aeternam.
R. Amen.

V. Benedicamus Domino.
R. Deo gratias.
V. Fidelium animae per misericordiam Dei requiescant in pace.
R. Amen.

Pater noster… [all in silence]

V. Deus det nobis suam pacem.
R. Amen.

And he adds: V. Tribuat Dominus benefactoribus nostris pro terrenis caelestia, pro temporalibus sempiterna.
R. Amen.

 

5. In Caena Serotina

“At collations: the small second meal allowed on fast days”

Lector: Benedicite.

The Priest gives the blessing, saying: Collationem servorum suorum benedicat Christus, Rex angelorum.
R. Amen.

 

Credit: the photograph is from New Liturgical Movement of the Monastery of San Benedetto’s booklet for the Benedictiones Mensae.

BENEDICTIONES MENSAE

“Blessings at the Table”
ENGLISH

1. Ante Prandium

“Before Lunch”

The Priest: May God bless you.
All: May God bless you.
The Priest: The eyes of all

And all continue: hope in You, Lord, and You give them food at a seasonable time. You open your hand, and you fill every living thing with blessing. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit, as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, for ever and ever. Amen.

Lord, have mercy.
Christ, have mercy.
Lord, have mercy.

Our Father… [continue in silence up to:]
V. And lead us not into temptation.
R. But deliver us from evil.

The Priest then says: Bless us, O Lord, and these Your gifts, which we are about to receive from Your bounty. Through Christ Our Lord.
R. Amen.

Then the Lector says: Bishop, we ask your blessing.
The Priest: May the King of eternal glory make us partakers in his heavenly meal.
R. Amen.

 

2. Post Prandium

“After Lunch”

The Lector begins: Do you, Lord, have mercy upon us.
R. Thanks be to God.

All rise. The Priest: May all your works confess You, Lord.
R. And may Your saints bless You. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, for ever and ever. Amen.

The Priest continues: We give You thanks, almighty God, for all Your benefices: Who live and reign for ever and ever.
R. Amen.

The following psalm is then said by all: Praise the Lord, all nations, Praise him, all peoples. For His mercy has been confirmed upon us, and the truth of the Lord remains forever. Glory be to the Father and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, for ever and ever. Amen.

Lord, have mercy.
Christ, have mercy.
Lord, have mercy.

Our Father… [continue in silence up to:]
V. And lead us not into temptation.
R. But deliver us from evil.
V. He distributed and gave to the poor.
R. His justice remains for ever and ever.
V. I shall bless the Lord at all times.
R. His praise will always be in my mouth.
V. In the Lord my soul will rejoice.
R. Let the meek hear, and let them rejoice.
V. Magnify the Lord with me.
R. And let us exalt His name together.
V. Let the name of the Lord be blessed.
R. From now and forevermore.

The Priest: Deign, Lord, to reward all of us doing good for Your name with eternal life. R. Amen.

V. Let us bless the Lord.
R. Thanks be to God.
V. May the souls of the faithful departed through the mercy of God rest in peace.
R. Amen.

Our Father… [all in silence]

V. May God grant us his peace.
R. Amen.

 

3. Ante Coenam

“Before Dinner”

The Priest: May God bless you.
All: May God bless you.
The Priest: The poor will eat

And all continue: and will be satisfied, and they will praise the Lord, who longs for them: let their hearts live for ever and ever. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, for ever and ever. Amen.

Lord, have mercy.
Christ, have mercy.
Lord, have mercy.

Our Father… [continue in silence up to:]
V. And lead us not into temptation.
R. But deliver us from evil.

The Priest then says: Bless us, O Lord, and these Your gifts, which we are about to receive from Your bounty. Through Christ Our Lord.
R. Amen.

Then the Lector says: Bishop, we ask your blessing.
The Priest: May the King of eternal glory make lead us to the meal of eternal life.
R. Amen.

 

4. In Fine Coenae

“At the End of Dinner”

The Lector begins: Do you, Lord, have mercy upon us.
R. Thanks be to God.

All rise. The Priest: The merciful and compassionate Lord has made a remembrance of his wondrous works. He has given food to those fearing him. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, for ever and ever. Amen.

The Priest continues: Blessed is God in His gifts, and holy in all His works, Who lives and reigns for ever and ever.
R. Amen.

The following psalm is then said by all: Praise the Lord, all nations, Praise him, all peoples. For His mercy has been confirmed upon us, and the truth of the Lord remains forever. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Lord, have mercy.
Christ, have mercy.
Lord, have mercy.

Our Father… [continue in silence up to:]
V. And lead us not into temptation.
R. But deliver us from evil.
V. He distributed and gave to the poor.
R. His justice remains for ever and ever.
V. I shall bless the Lord at all times.
R. His praise will always be in my mouth.
V. In the Lord my soul will rejoice.
R. Let the meek hear, and let them rejoice.
V. Magnify the Lord with me.
R. And let us exalt His name together.
V. Let the name of the Lord be blessed.
R. From now and forevermore.

The Priest: Deign, Lord, to reward all of us doing good for Your name with eternal life. R. Amen.

V. Let us bless the Lord.
R. Thanks be to God.
V. May the souls of the faithful departed through the mercy of God rest in peace. R. Amen.

Our Father… [all in silence]

V. May God grant us his peace.
R. Amen.

And he adds: V. May the Lord grant to us, who do good works, heavenly rewards instead of earthly reward, eternal rewards instead of temporal rewards.
R. Amen.

 

5. In Caena Serotina

“At collations: the small second meal allowed on fast days”

Lector: May God bless you.

The Priest gives the blessing, saying: May Christ, King of angels, bless this meal of His servants.
R. Amen.